Get your footie fix: Six places to watch the World Cup

FIFA World Cup 2018 is hosted in the Russian capital city of Moscow. (Shutterstock)
Updated 14 June 2018
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Get your footie fix: Six places to watch the World Cup

As the sporting event of the year kicks off, don’t panic if you still haven’t decided where you’re going to soak in all the action and cheer on your favorite team.

Jeddah: King Abdul Aziz Road sports tent

A large sports tent between King Abdul Aziz Road and Prince Nayef Street has been set up by the General Sports Authority, offering football fans the opportunity to watch matches for free. There is ample parking space and even a playground for children.

Dubai: Fairmont The Palm

Dubai’s Fairmont The Palm is set to wow the city’s football fans as they cheer on their national teams with a month-long World Cup tent offering promotional deals no matter what team you support. At a minimum spending cost of $26 per person, the World Cup tent offers a line-up of treats and munchies, ranging from popcorn shrimp to beef sliders.

Riyadh: The Green Halls

The Green Halls sports complex in Riyadh, located on Prince Faisal Bin Fahd Bin Abdul Aziz Road in the Ar Rafiah district, will live stream World Cup games for free from June 14 until July 15. 

Bahrain: Four Seasons Bahrain Bay

The tented Football Stadium at the Four Seasons Bahrain Bay is broadcasting the tournament’s matches on a massive 4 x 10-meter, high-definition screen together with 160 LCD screens dotted around the venue. Guests can choose from a selection of a la carte items, with a range of Arabic mezze and snacks, including burgers, nachos and spring rolls — all for a starting price of $31 per person.

Riyadh: Al-Yamama Press Tent 

And here’s another option in Riyadh — the Al-Yamama Press Foundation’s tent in its headquarters on Al-Qassim road. The tent is equipped with screens, a studio for post-game analysis, coffee shops and food trucks. Attendees also have the chance to win various daily prizes. 

Beirut: Number 12 Fan Park

At the heart of Beirut’s bustling Mar Mkhael district, Number 12 Fan Park is set to showcase World Cup games on a large screen. At a regular entry cost of $8 and a VIP cost of $17, the park is set to be filled with fans cheering on their teams while enjoying a meal at the food court or competing with friends in one of the many activity areas.


Ancient musical instruments get an airing in Athens

Updated 21 June 2018
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Ancient musical instruments get an airing in Athens

  • The phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos — string and wind instruments reconstructed by musical group Lyravlos — echoed among marble statues in Athens’s National Archaeological Museum.
  • Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious, to social to athletic events.

ATHENS: Hymns sung to the Greek gods thousands of years ago resonated from ancient musical instruments in Athens on Thursday, transporting a transfixed audience to antiquity.
The phorminx, the kitharis, the krotala and the aulos — string and wind instruments reconstructed by musical group Lyravlos — echoed among marble statues in Athens’s National Archaeological Museum as part of World Music Day celebrations.
A family of musicians, Lyravlos have recreated exact replicas of the ancient instruments from natural materials including animal shells, bones, hides and horns.
Music was an integral part of almost every aspect of ancient Greek society, from religious, to social to athletic events. Today only some 60 written scores of ancient Greek music have survived, said Lyravlos member Michael Stefos.
Stefos said they interpret them as best they can, relying on the accuracy of their recreated instruments.
“Joking aside, ancient CDs have never been found,” he said.
Their performance included a hymn to the god Apollo, pieces played at the musical festival of the ancient Pythian Games in Delphi and during wine-laden rituals to the god Dionysus.
Michael’s father Panayiotis Stefos, who heads the group, travels to museums at home and abroad studying ancient Greek antiquities and texts in order to recreate the instruments.
“Usually each instrument has a different sound. It is not something you can make on a computer, it will not be a carbon copy,” said Stefos.
The difference with modern day instruments?
“If someone holds it in their arms and starts playing, after a few minutes they don’t want to let it go, because it vibrates and pulsates with your body,” he said.
French tourist Helene Piaget, who watched the performance, said it was “inspiring.”
“One sees them on statues, on reliefs, and you can’t imagine what they might sound like,” she said.
World Music Day is an annual celebration that takes place on the summer solstice.