Where We Are Going Today: Layla’s Gourmet in Jeddah is that perfect place for intimate conversations

Updated 16 June 2018
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Where We Are Going Today: Layla’s Gourmet in Jeddah is that perfect place for intimate conversations

  • Amid relaxing background music, the homely entrance is filled with desserts

If you are looking for a charming, quiet cafe in central Jeddah, the well-hidden Layla’s Gourmet is the ideal place.

The cozy, child-free cafe is perfect for intimate conversations, getting some writing done or just having a quiet evening with a friend.

Amid relaxing background music, the homely entrance is filled with desserts. The decoration is grandiose yet simple, and the masks on the wall make it seem like an Elizabethan-era waiting hall.

Whether it is Nutella-, date- or pistachio-flavored, the kanafa will rock your world. Other desserts include red velvet, date and caramel cakes. Layla’s Gourmet also serves a variety of fresh juices and all types of coffee.


What We Are Reading Today: The Art of Philosophy by Susanna Berger

Updated 20 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Art of Philosophy by Susanna Berger

  • The Art of Philosophy shows that the making and study of visual art functioned as important methods of philosophical thinking and instruction

Delving into the intersections between artistic images and philosophical knowledge in Europe from the late 16th to the early 18th centuries, The Art of Philosophy shows that the making and study of visual art functioned as important methods of philosophical thinking and instruction. From frontispieces of books to monumental prints created by philosophers in collaboration with renowned artists, Susanna Berger examines visual representations of philosophy and overturns prevailing assumptions about the limited function of the visual in European intellectual history.

Rather than merely illustrating already-existing philosophical concepts, visual images generated new knowledge for both Aristotelian thinkers and anti-Aristotelians, such as Descartes and Hobbes. Printmaking and drawing played a decisive role in discoveries that led to a move away from the authority of Aristotle in the 17th century. Berger interprets visual art from printed books, student lecture notebooks, alba amicorum (friendship albums), broadsides, and paintings, and examines the work of such artists as Pietro Testa, Léonard Gaultier, Abraham Bosse, Dürer, and Rembrandt.

In particular, she focuses on the rise and decline of the “plural image,” a genre that was popular among early modern philosophers. Plural images brought multiple images together on the same page, often in order to visualize systems of logic, metaphysics, natural philosophy, or moral philosophy.