England wins World Cup match, fan mounts car, falls off – well why wouldn’t he?

Screen grab of the moment a large England fan decides that mounting the bonnet of a car in celebration of his team's first win was a good idea (YouTube)
Updated 19 June 2018
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England wins World Cup match, fan mounts car, falls off – well why wouldn’t he?

  • If you're a football fan and your team wins, you're going to celebrate
  • But we suggest that you don't do this - you might get hurt, and/or arrested

CAIRO: Goal celebrations are always a sight to behold, both on, and off the pitch – special cheers, chants and dances – every team has something they can claim as their own – but of course someone, somewhere will always go that bit too far.

When England met Tunisia on Monday evening, jubilant fans took to the streets of the British seaside city of Plymouth to celebrate after Harry Kane sealed the 2-1 win in stoppage time.

Nothing wrong with that – obviously. And as UK newspaper The Metro noted, the celebrations were  “like we had just won the World Cup.” 

But among the football fans seen taking over Union Street in Plymouth was one overexcited man who decided to ride on top of a moving car as part of his celebration. 

The man can be seen in footage climbing on top of a car, which then speeds up before braking suddenly, sending the large man tumbling onto the road.

But fear not – the footage then goes onto show him getting up and rejoining the crowds, like nothing had happened.

Maybe next time it will be easier if he just cheers. 

Now watch the video, just promise not to try this yourself

 

 


Rebel Wilson loses bid to keep most of $3.4 million defamation payout

Updated 16 November 2018
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Rebel Wilson loses bid to keep most of $3.4 million defamation payout

  • The actress had sued Woman’s Day magazine last year over a series of articles in 2015
  • ‘The whole reason for bringing this case is that I wanted to stand up to a bully, which is Bauer Media’

SYDNEY: Rebel Wilson said she was glad she’d stood up to “a bully” despite losing her bid Friday to keep most of the record payout awarded to her in her defamation case against an Australian magazine.
The actress had sued Woman’s Day magazine last year over a series of articles in 2015 that she said had painted her as someone who’d lied about her real name, age and childhood in order to make it in Hollywood.
The Supreme Court of Victoria state awarded her an Australian-record payout of $3.4 million (A$4.7 million) after a jury concluded she’d missed out on film roles because of the articles. Wilson had sought $5 million in damages.
But this June the amount was reduced by 90 percent after the magazine’s publishers, Bauer Media, appealed. Victoria’s Court of Appeal said Wilson could not prove economic loss, or that she’d missed out on film contracts as a result of the articles. The court ordered the actress to pay back almost $3 million, and 80 percent of Bauer’s legal costs.
Wilson’s lawyers on Friday sought leave to appeal against the reduction in the High Court — Australia’s highest judicial body — but the application was refused.
“In our opinion there are insufficient prospects that an appeal will succeed,” Justice Virginia Bell said at the court in the national capital, Canberra.
The magazine publisher welcomed the decision. “Bauer Media is invested in its Australian business now more than ever,” Bauer chief executive Paul Dykzeul said in a statement. “Our audience trust our content and our writers and they love our iconic brands like Woman’s Day and Australian Women’s Weekly.”
Wilson, who sat in the front row of the public gallery during the brief hearing, said outside the court she was glad the process had been brought to an end.
“This has been a long fight and a long journey in the courts, but the great thing about today is that it brings it to a definitive end,” she told reporters.
“The whole reason for bringing this case is that I wanted to stand up to a bully, which is Bauer Media.”
Wilson said she was proud of herself for “seeing it out right to the bitter end,” and that she was glad the initial jury had “restored my reputation.”
“Today was just about a small point of special damages and for me it was never about the money, it was about standing up to a bully and I’ve done that.”
Wilson is a native Australian best known for her Hollywood roles in the “Pitch Perfect” films and “Bridesmaids.”