New Zealand PM Jacinda Ardern goes into hospital to give birth

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, right, addresses Parliament in Wellington, New Zealand. (AP)
Updated 21 June 2018
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New Zealand PM Jacinda Ardern goes into hospital to give birth

WELLINGTON, New Zealand: New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern arrived Thursday at Auckland Hospital as she prepared to give birth to her first child.
The 37-year-old Ardern would become just the second elected world leader in modern times to give birth while in office, after the late Pakistan Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto gave birth to daughter Bakhtawar in 1990.
Ardern’s due date was June 17. The birth has been highly anticipated in the South Pacific nation of nearly 5 million people. She has not said whether she’s expecting a boy or a girl.
Ardern’s office confirmed she had arrived at the hospital with partner Clarke Gayford.
Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters has taken over as acting prime minister. Ardern plans to take a six-week leave before returning to work.
Under the arrangement, Ardern will still be consulted on major decisions, including issues of national security.
Ardern has said she is confident the government will continue to run smoothly in her absence.
She said she hoped to be “sharing the good news” in an announcement but also to have some quiet time to enjoy as a family.
Asked earlier this month how the couple had been faring while trying to choose a name, Ardern responded: “Terribly. Do you have any suggestions?“


Mueller Report: Russia did attempt to meddle in 2016 US election, no evidence of US coordination

Updated 44 min 3 sec ago
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Mueller Report: Russia did attempt to meddle in 2016 US election, no evidence of US coordination

WASHINGTON: US Attorney General William Barr said on Thursday that the Mueller Report confirms the Russian government sought to meddle in the 2016 US presidential election, but that no evidence was found that any American conspired or coordinated with the Russian government.

While Mueller drew no conclusion about whether President Donald Trump had obstructed justice in the investigation, Barr said he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein personally had concluded that while Trump was "frustrated and angry" about the Mueller probe, nothing the president did rose to the level of an "obstruction-of-justice offense," Barr said

Mueller's report examined 10 episodes pertaining to Trump and obstruction.

Barr said the president did not exert executive privilege to withhold anything in the report. And he said the president's personal attorney had requested and gotten a chance to review the report before its public release.

The Justice Department was to release a redacted version of the special counsel's report later Thursday on Russian election interference and the Trump campaign, opening up months, if not years, of fights over what the document means in a deeply divided country.