Turkey strikes back, taxing $1.8 billion worth of US goods

A man walks in front of a shop in the Turkish border province of Kilis on January 24, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 21 June 2018
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Turkey strikes back, taxing $1.8 billion worth of US goods

WASHINGTON: Turkey is imposing tariffs on nearly two dozen US products, ranging from cars to sunscreen, to strike back at Washington’s sanctions on imported steel and aluminum.
According to documents filed with the World Trade Organization, Turkey will slap $267 million in tariffs on $1.8 billion worth of products the United States exports to Turkey.
The tariffs, which take effect Thursday, are in retaliation for President Donald Trump’s decision to tax foreign steel and aluminum. The US says the metals imports pose a threat to US national security. The move has enraged traditional US allies such as the European Union, Canada and Turkey.
On Friday, the 28-nation EU will start taxing a range of US imports, including Harley-Davidson motorcycles and cranberries.
“We cannot and will not allow Turkey to be wrongly blamed for America’s economic challenges,” said Turkish Economy Minister Nihat Zeybekci.
The US tariffs come to $267 million on $1.1 billion in Turkish steel and aluminum shipments to the United States. Turkey is America 32nd-biggest trading partner, according to the Office of the US Trade Representative.


WTO reviews China bid to slap US anti-dumping trade sanctions

Updated 14 min 38 sec ago
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WTO reviews China bid to slap US anti-dumping trade sanctions

  • The decision to appoint an arbitrator was reached during a special meeting of the WTO Dispute Settlement Body
  • The use of anti-dumping duties is permitted under international trade rules as long as they adhere to strict conditions

GENEVA: A World Trade Organization arbitrator will review Friday a Chinese request to impose more than $7 billion in annual sanctions on the US over anti-dumping practices, a Geneva trade official said.
The decision to appoint an arbitrator was reached during a special meeting of the WTO Dispute Settlement Body convened to discuss developments in a five-year-old trade dispute between the world’s top two economies.
Beijing had already warned earlier this month that it planned to ask the global trade body during the meeting for permission to impose $7.04 billion in annual trade sanctions on Washington in the case.
China’s representative told Friday’s meeting that measures taken by Washington had “seriously infringed China’s legitimate economic and trade interests.”
A source close to the WTO meanwhile said that the arbitration “was automatically triggered after the United States informed the WTO that it objected to the level of retaliation proposed by China.”
WTO arbitration can often be a drawn-out process, and the results are not expected to be known for months.
China initially filed its dispute against the US back in December 2013, taking issue with the way Washington assesses whether exports have been “dumped” at unfairly low prices onto the US market.
The use of anti-dumping duties is permitted under international trade rules as long as they adhere to strict conditions, and disputes over their use are often brought before the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Body.
In this specific case, China alleged that the US, in violation of WTO rules, was continuing a practice known as “zeroing,” which calculates the price of imports compared to the normal value in the US to determine predatory pricing.
In October 2016, a panel of WTO experts found largely in China’s favor in the case, including on the issue of “zeroing.”
The US, which has repeatedly lost cases before the WTO over its calculation method, said in June last year that it would implement the panel’s recommendations within a “reasonable” time frame.
This past January, the DSB set an August 22 deadline for Washington to bring its practices in line with the 2016 ruling.
According to WTO rules, the plaintiff in such cases can request permission to impose sanctions if the parties have not reached agreement on a satisfactory compensation within 20 days of the WTO deadline.