Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi lowers target as it kicks off IPO

Xiaomi had hoped to raise $10 billion with the Hong Kong IPO, making it the biggest since Alibaba’s $25 billion New York debut in 2014. (AFP)
Updated 21 June 2018
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Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi lowers target as it kicks off IPO

HONG KONG: Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi kicked off its initial public offering Thursday but the firm is likely to pull in about $6.1 billion, far less than originally expected, with investors having mixed views about its main business.
Xiaomi had hoped to raise $10 billion with the Hong Kong IPO, making it the biggest since Alibaba’s $25 billion New York debut in 2014 and valuing the company at about $100 billion.
However, the firm is offering 2.18 billion shares at HK$17-HK$22 apiece, according to Bloomberg News, which values it at about $53.9-$69.8 billion.
Xiaomi had hoped to be the first company to list shares in Hong Kong at the same time as launching new Chinese Depository Receipts (CDRs) in Shanghai under new rules announced in April by mainland authorities to open up markets in the world’s number two economy.
But on Tuesday it put off its decision on listing the CDRs until it completes its IPO in Hong Kong. The China Securities Regulatory Commission said it has canceled a listing review originally scheduled for June 19.
This delay, as well as differing market views about Xiaomi’s business model, were also among reasons for the lower valuation.
CEO Lei Jun claimed it was an Internet services company making money via online games and advertisements despite 70 percent of its revenues coming from selling hardware, particularly smartphones.
The firm, which mainly sells cheap but high-quality smartphones in China, is looking to push into Europe — recently opening its first flagship store in Paris — as the home market reaches saturation point.
China Mobile and US wireless-chip giant Qualcomm are among the cornerstone investors and it is expected to list on July 9.
Chinese authorities devised the CDR program, under which homegrown companies listed abroad can simultaneously list at home, after watching technology heavyweights Alibaba and Baidu list on Wall Street.
The objectives of the plan include helping to develop China’s still relatively immature and volatile share markets while allowing domestic investors to invest in the country’s big tech champions.
Alibaba and Hong Kong-listed Tencent have expressed an interest in the plan.
Xiaomi shipped 28 million smartphones worldwide from January to March, an 88-percent surge year-on-year.
That was fourth in the world after Samsung, Apple and China’s Huawei, according to figures from the International Data Corporation.


Japan, EU to sign widespread trade deal eliminating tariffs

Updated 17 July 2018
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Japan, EU to sign widespread trade deal eliminating tariffs

  • Both sides are heralding the deal, which covers a third of the global economy and more than 600 million people
  • Besides the latest deal with the EU, Japan is working on other trade agreements, including a far-reaching trans-Pacific deal

TOKYO: The European Union and Japan are signing a widespread trade deal Tuesday that will eliminate nearly all tariffs, seemingly defying the worries about trade tensions set off by President Donald Trump’s policies.
The signing in Tokyo for the deal, largely reached late last year, is ceremonial. It was delayed from earlier this month because Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe canceled going to Brussels over a disaster in southwestern Japan, caused by extremely heavy rainfall. More than 200 people died from flooding and landslides.
European Council President Donald Tusk and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, who arrived Monday, will also attend a gala dinner at the prime minister’s official residence.
Both sides are heralding the deal, which covers a third of the global economy and more than 600 million people.
The deal eliminates about 99 percent of the tariffs on Japanese goods to the EU, but remaining at around 94 percent for European imports into Japan for now and rising to 99 percent over the years. The difference is due to exceptions such as rice, a product that’s culturally and politically sensitive and has been protected for decades in Japan.
The major step toward liberalizing trade was discussed in talks since 2013 but is striking in the timing of the signing, as China and the US are embroiled in trade conflicts.
The US is proposing 10 percent tariffs on a $200 billion list of Chinese goods. That follows an earlier move by Washington to impose 25 percent tariffs on $34 billion of Chinese goods. Beijing has responded by imposing identical penalties on a similar amount of American imports.
Besides the latest deal with the EU, Japan is working on other trade agreements, including a far-reaching trans-Pacific deal. The partnership includes Australia, Mexico, Vietnam and other nations, although the US has withdrawn.
Japan praised the deal with the EU as coming from Abe’s “Abenomics” policies, designed to wrest the economy out of stagnation despite a shrinking population and cautious spending. Japan’s growth continues to be heavily dependent on exports.
By strengthening ties with the EU, Japan hopes to vitalize mutual direct investment, fight other global trends toward protectionism and enhance the stature of Japanese brands, the foreign ministry said in a statement.
The EU said the trade liberalization will lead to the region’s export growth in chemicals, clothing, cosmetics and beer to Japan, leading to job security for Europe. Japanese will get cheaper cheese, such as Parmesan, gouda and cheddar, as well as chocolate and biscuits.
Japanese consumers have historically coveted European products, and a drop in prices is likely to boost spending.