Netanyahu’s wife charged with $100,000 food delivery fraud

Sara Netanyahu was charged with fraud and breach of trust on June 21, 2018 after a long police probe into allegations she falsified household expenses, the justice ministry said. (Reuters)
Updated 21 June 2018
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Netanyahu’s wife charged with $100,000 food delivery fraud

  • The allegations announced last year are that she and an aide falsely declared there were no cooks available at the prime minister’s official residence and ordered from outside caterers at public expense.
  • Benjamin Netanyahu is also under investigation on suspicion of corruption offenses.

JERUSALEM: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s wife Sara was charged Thursday with fraud and breach of trust after a lengthy probe into allegations she misused state funds to claim for delivery meals costing $100,000.
The move represents the latest legal headache for Netanyahu and his family, as the authorities investigate the combative leader over allegations of corruption in a string of eye-catching cases.
The justice ministry announced that “the Jerusalem district prosecutor filed charges against the prime minister’s wife.”
The ministry said Sara Netanyahu, who turns 60 in November, was accused of falsely declaring there were no cooks available at the premier’s official residence and ordering “hundreds of meals from outside caterers at public expense.”
From 2010 to 2013 Netanyahu, her family and guests received “fraudulently from the state hundreds of prepared meals (each including a number of courses) to the value of 359,000 shekels ($99,700),” the indictment read.
Netanyahu, a high-profile presence at her husband’s side throughout his lengthy time at the helm, has denied any wrongdoing.
Her lawyers, in a statement, dismissed the charges as “delusional” and pointed out that she herself had not ordered the meals, many of which were for official guests and in some cases for residence staff.
According to the charge sheet, the meals were ordered from a variety of well-known Jerusalem establishments, including an Italian restaurant, a Middle Eastern grill joint and a sushi establishment.
The trial, which could run for months, is to be held in the Jerusalem magistrates court, with the prosecution requesting a panel of three judges due to the “public sensitivity” of the case.

The legal woes come as Netanyahu’s husband himself is under the microscope on suspicion of a series of corruption offenses.
In one case, the prime minister and his family are suspected of receiving one million shekels worth of luxury cigars, champagne and jewelry from wealthy individuals in exchange for financial or personal favors.
In another case, investigators suspect the premier of trying to reach an agreement with the owner of Yediot Aharonot, a top Israeli newspaper, for more favorable coverage.
Netanyahu has protested his innocence and vowed to remain in power, saying he is the victim of a “witch-hunt.”

 

 


Oman to replace scores of expat nurses as visa ban continues

Updated 46 min 24 sec ago
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Oman to replace scores of expat nurses as visa ban continues

  • Oman has been gradually increasing the level jobs closed to expats
  • Oman has seen a significant increase in the number of its citizens in employment since the visa ban was introduced

DUBAI: Scores of expat nurse are to be replaced by Omani nationals in the ongoing Omanization project aimed at getting more locals into work, Times of Oman reported.

There will be 200 nurses replaced across the country, Oman’s Ministry of Health, confirmed - applications will be open from March to 14.

Oman’s government introduced a six-month expat visa ban in January last year, which was later extended.  

The visa ban, implemented at the end of January last year, resulted in the hiring of 64,386 Omanis in private sector companies and establishments and 4,125 more in government agencies.

Gulf countries have been historically dependent on expatriate workers to power their economies; with a 2013 study indicating as much as 71 percent of Oman’s labor force are non-nationals. In Qatar, expatriate workforce was as high as 95 percent while in the UAE it was 94 percent; 83 percent in Kuwait; 64 percent in Bahrain and 49 percent in Saudi Arabia.

The Gulf states have since launched nationalization programs to absorb more of their citizens into the labor force, as well as address high levels of unemployment.

Between December 2018 and November last year, a total of 60,807 expatriate workers left Oman’s labor force or an equivalent 3.6 percent reduction in their numbers, which now stands at 1,734,882.