Libya’s state oil firm confirms LNA control of oil ports

Smoke and flame rise from an oil storage tank that was set on fire amid fighting between rival factions at Ras Lanuf terminal in Libya. (National Oil Corporation via Reuters)
Updated 22 June 2018
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Libya’s state oil firm confirms LNA control of oil ports

VIENNA: The head of Libya’s National Oil Corporation (NOC) confirmed on Friday that Khalifa Haftar’s Libyan National Army (LNA) had regained control of the key oil ports of Ras Lanuf and Es Sider, and said he hoped operations would resume in the “next couple of days.”

NOC Chairman Mustafa Sanalla said Libya had been losing 450,000 barrels per day (bpd) of production after clashes between the LNA and rival factions closed the two terminals.

The LNA took the ports back on Thursday in heavy fighting, a week after an attack by anti-Haftar armed groups had forced them to withdraw.

“We lost 450,000 bpd in last eight to nine days and hopefully in next couple of days we can resume operations,” Sanalla told reporters ahead of an OPEC meeting in Vienna.

A fire that broke out at a third storage tank in Ras Lanuf on Thursday had been put out, he said.

“We had a minor fire yesterday and we extinguished it and the situation there is good. We will make the assessments and then resume operations as soon as possible.”

Two other storage tanks at Ras Lanuf had caught on fire earlier in the fighting, causing extensive damage.

Libya’s national oil production has dropped to between 600,000 and 700,000 bpd due to the closure of the ports.


Iraq court sentences four to death for joining Daesh

Updated 1 min 16 sec ago
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Iraq court sentences four to death for joining Daesh

  • Daesh captured a third of Iraq in 2014 but was largely defeated both there and in neighboring Syria where US-backed forces proclaimed last month the capture of Daesh’s last territory
BAGHDAD: An Iraqi court has sentenced four people to death by hanging for belonging to the Daesh militant group and committing terrorist crimes in Iraq and Syria, a judiciary statement said on Sunday.
The four men, wanted by Iraqi authorities, were handed to Iraq by the US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), the statement said.
A Baghdad criminal court convicted them for joining Daesh and “carrying out criminal operations that targeted innocent civilians with the aim of undermining peace and stability in Iraq and Syria.” A judicial source said the four men were Iraqi.
In February, Iraq’s military said the SDF had handed 280 Iraqi and foreign detainees to Baghdad.
Thousands of foreigners have fought on behalf of Daesh in Iraq and Syria since at least 2014. Many foreign women came — or were brought — from overseas to join the militants. Iraqi courts are relying on counterterrorism laws to prosecute thousands of suspects, including foreign militants, for joining the ultra-hard-line militant group.
Human rights groups have accused Iraqi and other regional forces of inconsistencies in the judicial process and flawed trials leading to unfair convictions.
Daesh captured a third of Iraq in 2014 but was largely defeated both there and in neighboring Syria where US-backed forces proclaimed last month the capture of Daesh’s last territory.