South Sudan government ‘had enough’ of rebel leader - spokesman

The Sudan People's Liberation Movement-in-Opposition (SPLM-IO) rebel group leader Riek Machar (C) attends the 32nd Extraordinary Summit of Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) in Addis Ababa on June 21, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 22 June 2018
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South Sudan government ‘had enough’ of rebel leader - spokesman

  • Hopes of a breakthrough toward ending South Sudan’s civil war had been raised this week by Ethiopia’s brokering of the first face-to-face meeting between Machar and President Salva Kiir

ADDIS ABABA: South Sudan’s information minister said Friday the country’s rebel leader could not rejoin government, dealing a blow to hopes that the latest talks in Ethiopia might bring peace.
“We have had enough of Riek Machar,” said Michael Makuei, referring to the rebel chief.
“As the people of South Sudan, not the president alone, but as the people of South Sudan, we are saying enough is enough.”
Hopes of a breakthrough toward ending South Sudan’s civil war had been raised this week by Ethiopia’s brokering of the first face-to-face meeting between Machar and President Salva Kiir on Wednesday.
It was followed by a gathering of regional heads of state on Thursday.
But the South Sudan government’s position shows the personal enmity between the two men that lies at the heart of the four-year-old conflict is as strong as ever, despite the handshakes and smiles of recent days.
Makuei accused Machar of being a serial coup plotter who had no place in any transitional government.
“We don’t want him politically,” he said, adding that if Machar sought the presidency he should do so via the ballot.
“If he wants to be the president he should await elections,” Makuei said.
Machar’s SPLM-IO rebel group had also taken a hard position as the summit got underway Thursday, dismissing current peace efforts as “unrealistic.”
Despite the fighting talk Kiir and Machar are expected to meet again on Monday in Sudan where President Omar Al-Bashir has offered to host further talks.
A landlocked state with a large ethnic mix, South Sudan gained independence from Sudan in 2011 after a long and brutal war.
The event was hailed around the world and by celebrity supporters such as George Clooney.
But in 2013, Kiir accused Machar, his vice president, of plotting a coup against him, and violence erupted between the two factions, feeding on brooding ethnic tensions.
Tens of thousands of people have been killed and nearly a third of the 12 million population have been driven out of their homes, and many to the brink of starvation.


Russian-backed air strikes hit Daesh in southern Syria — sources

Updated 18 min 46 sec ago
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Russian-backed air strikes hit Daesh in southern Syria — sources

  • Daesh-affiliated forces entrenched in the Yarmouk Basin
  • The agricultural area has become the main battleground in the sensitive border region

AMMAN: Russian and Syrian jets stepped up their bombing of a Daesh bastion along the Jordan-Israel border in southwestern Syria, as the militants pushed into areas abandoned by other rebel groups, diplomatic and opposition sources said.
Daesh-affiliated forces entrenched in the Yarmouk Basin, which borders the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights and Jordan, also repelled a ground attack by the Syrian army and its allies, the sources added.
The agricultural area has become the main battleground in the sensitive border region after a major Russian-backed Syrian army offensive routed other rebel groups who were once backed by Washington, Jordan and Gulf states.
An intelligence source told Reuters 1,000-1,500 Daesh fighters had been holding their ground despite the 10-day-old bombing campaign that he said had hit villages and caused “untold number” of civilian casualties
A former resident in touch with relatives said thousands of civilians whose villages have been bombed have fled to the safety of areas either held by the army or rebels.
Another source familiar with the situation said Daesh had actually been able to expand its territory over the last 20 hours by seizing at least 18 villages abandoned by other rebels under the banner of the Free Syrian Army (FSA).
Daesh was taking advantage of the collapse of its ideological FSA rivals which it views as apostates, the source said.
The United States once armed the southern FSA rebels, but told them at the start of the Russian-Syrian offensive not to expect its intervention. While cutting other aid to the rebels, Washington had continued to provide those fighting Islamic State with weapons, the source added.
The Syrian army said its aerial strikes and shelling of militants in the Yarmouk Basin — the only territorial pocket held by the hard-line Sunni fundamentalists in the country’s southwest — had killed “tens of terrorists” in a campaign whose goal it said was to crush militants.
The army and its allies have been pushing to expand their foothold near the Golan frontier by negotiating surrender deals with rebel groups and allowing them to move to opposition-held areas in northern Syria.