Iran regime is criminal, suppresses its people and supports terror, says US Secretary of State Pompeo

Photo showing US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meets with German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen at the US State Department in Washington, DC on June 20, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 22 June 2018
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Iran regime is criminal, suppresses its people and supports terror, says US Secretary of State Pompeo

  • Top diplomat says Tehran “funds terrorism while Iranians are hungry and in need.”
  • Says Iranians “deserve respect for their human rights.”

LONDON: The US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has attacked the Iranian government, calling it a criminal regime that suppresses its people.
In a tweet on his Twitter account Pompeo said the “Tehran regime is criminal and suppresses its citizens and does not respect their rights.”
This regime, he added, “funds terrorism while Iranians are hungry and in need.”
The tweet also stated that “5,000 Iranians were arrested during protests in January; 30 women were put in prison for protesting against wearing the veil; in addition to the imprisonment of Sufis and environmental activists. The regime also arrested 430 farmers in Isfahan Province.”
Pompeo added that “Iranians deserve respect for their human rights.”
In another tweet, Pompeo publishes a photo of Major Gen. Qasem Soleimani, the commander of the Revolutionary Guards Quds Brigade, with a comment saying “Iran’s corrupt regime has enriched the IRGC, Hezbollah and Hamas and squandered the country’s wealth on foreign proxy wars while Iranian families struggle.”


Two Australian WWI soldiers laid to rest in France

Updated 12 November 2018
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Two Australian WWI soldiers laid to rest in France

  • Private Hedley Roy MacBeth, aged 31, and acting corporal James Leonard Rolls, aged 23, were killed in May 1917 during the second battle of Bullecourt
  • The bodies of the two soldiers from the Australian Imperial Force’s 24th infantry battalion were discovered by a disused railway track on May 23 May, 2015

BUISSY: Two Australian soldiers, killed over 100 years ago during World War I, were finally laid to rest in northern France on Monday as relatives stood by.
“He’s not an unknown soldier anymore, we know where he is,” said Robert MacBeth, 36, from Ballan, in Australia’s Victoria state, speaking of his great grandfather.
Private Hedley Roy MacBeth, aged 31, and acting corporal James Leonard Rolls, aged 23, were killed in May 1917 during the second battle of Bullecourt.
British and Australian troops managed to push back German lines during a week-long offensive which left 7,000 dead in the allied ranks.
“We are very happy, it’s very emotional that we’re finally burying him with full military honors and that he has been put safely to rest here in France,” Irene Darby, Rolls’ great niece, told AFP at the ceremony led by Australia’s Governor-General Peter Cosgrove at the Quéant Road Cemetery, near Buissy.
The bodies of the two soldiers from the Australian Imperial Force’s 24th infantry battalion were discovered by a disused railway track on May 23 May, 2015.
They were formally identified in August this year thanks to DNA testing of their relatives.
The two men were in a trench near the railway line when an artillery shell exploded nearby, according to army archives.
They will now rest alongside some 2,400 Commonwealth and German soldiers in the cemetery run by the Commonwealth war graves commission.
“The family always knew about James, he was spoken about at every Anzac Day,” Darby said.
“We can now say we found him and we can come and visit him now, we know where he is,” she added.
Almost 62,000 Australian soldiers were killed during WWI.
Historians believe the bodies of 700,000 of the 3.5 million soldiers killed on the Western Front are still missing.