Yemen's Houthi militias use children to plant mines in liberated areas: minister

Yemen’s minister of human rights Dr. Mohammed Askar revealed that Houthi militias backed by Iran are using children to plant mines in areas that they are being expelled from. (AFP)
Updated 22 June 2018
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Yemen's Houthi militias use children to plant mines in liberated areas: minister

  • Yemen’s minister of human rights revealed that Houthi militias backed by Iran are using children to plant mines in areas that they are being expelled from.
  • Askar explained that Houthi militias used different types of mines, including anti-personnel mines which are banned in residential areas and are very dangerous, and camouflaged and improvised mines.

LONDON: Yemen’s minister of human rights Dr. Mohammed Askar revealed that Houthi militias backed by Iran are using children to plant mines in areas that they are being expelled from. He also said that they are planting bombs in houses, hospitals, and places of worship, threatening civilians.
Askar explained that Houthi militias used different types of mines, including anti-personnel mines which are banned in residential areas and are very dangerous, and camouflaged and improvised mines.
The Houthi militias have also invented new ways of using anti-vehicle mines and transforming them so that they can be used as anti-personnel mines with the intention of killing and injuring as many people as possible.
He added that Houthi militias have exploited the difficult economic and social conditions and the complex tribal nature of Yemen to attract and recruit children.
Many families send their children to join the Houthis in exchange for 50,000 Yemeni riyals ($150) in order to fulfil their daily needs, especially in large families.
Houthis are also carrying out campaigns to religiously mobilize children in Saudi where students are given weekly lessons on the benefits of war.


Iraq court condemns to death ‘deputy of Daesh leader’

Updated 19 September 2018
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Iraq court condemns to death ‘deputy of Daesh leader’

  • An Iraqi courtsentenced to death by hanging one of the most prominent leaders of Daesh
  • Al-Ithawi was extradited from Turkey earlier this year having fled Syria as the group’s self-proclaimed “caliphate” crumbled

BAGHDAD: An Iraqi court on Wednesday sentenced a prominent militant described as a deputy of Daesh group leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi to death on terrorism charges.
“The Karkh criminal court in Baghdad sentenced to death by hanging one of the most prominent leaders of Daesh, who served as a deputy of Baghdadi,” judicial spokesman Abdel Sattar Bayraqdar said.
Ismail Alwan Salman Al-Ithawi was extradited from Turkey earlier this year having fled Syria as the group’s self-proclaimed “caliphate” crumbled.
He was tracked and detained through cooperation between Turkish, Iraqi and US intelligence agencies, a senior Iraqi official told AFP in February.
A native of the Iraqi city of Ramadi, Ithawi was accused of holding several positions including Daesh “minister” in charge of religious edicts.
Iraq declared “victory” over Daesh In December after a three-year war against the extremists who once controlled nearly one third of the country as well as swathes of neighboring Syria.
Baghdadi has been pronounced dead on several occasions, but an Iraqi intelligence official said in May that he remained alive in Syrian territory by the Iraqi border.
The Daesh chief called on Muslims to wage “jihad” in a purported new audio recording released last month.