Palestinian official: US peace plan doomed to fail

Nabil Abu Rdeneh said Saturday President Trump’s team is headed toward a dead end because they are not engaging the Palestinians or their positions. (AFP)
Updated 23 June 2018
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Palestinian official: US peace plan doomed to fail

  • Nabil Abu Rdeneh said Saturday President Trump’s team is headed toward a dead end because they are not engaging the Palestinians or their positions.
  • Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner along with Mideast envoy Jason Greenblatt and Ambassador David Friedman met with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Friday in Jerusalem.

RAMALLAH: The Palestinian president’s spokesman says any US peace plan that bypasses the Palestinians is doomed to fail.
Nabil Abu Rdeneh said Saturday President Trump’s team is headed toward a dead end because they are not engaging the Palestinians or their positions. Abu Rudeneh says the US should “abandon the illusion that creating false facts and falsifying history are going to help it sell those illusions.”
Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner along with Mideast envoy Jason Greenblatt and Ambassador David Friedman met with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Friday in Jerusalem. The Trump administration is expected to unveil its Middle East peace plan shortly. Trump has promised to pursue the “ultimate deal.”
The Palestinians have shunned the Americans since Trump announced he was recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.


The consequences of appeasement in the 1930s

British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s ‘piece of paper” in 1938. (Wikimedia Commons)
Updated 26 min 9 sec ago
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The consequences of appeasement in the 1930s

DUBAI: The 2015 agreement aimed at curbing Iran’s nuclear program was not the first “piece of paper” to lull the world into a false sense of security.

In September 1938, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain returned to the UK after a meeting in Munich with Nazi leader Adolf Hitler.

The meeting was the culmination of three years of the policy known as “appeasement” — a series of concessions that allowed Hitler to annex Austria, rebuild the German navy and remilitarize the Rhineland, with the eventual aim of dominating Europe.

Supporters of appeasement believed that each new concession made a European war less likely, even as Hitler made his intentions clear.

In the summer of 1938, the Nazi leader sent 750,000 German troops to the German-Czech border as a prelude to the invasion of the Sudetenland, an ethnically German part of Czechoslovakia. Chamberlain flew to Munich for talks, and accepted an assurance from Hitler that, with the Sudetenland incorporated into Germany, his territorial ambitions were at an end.

“I hold in my hand a piece of paper…” Chamberlain told the waiting crowds at Heston aerodrome when he returned to Britain. “I believe it is peace for our time.”

A year later, Germany invaded Poland — and the world embarked on the most destructive war in history.