Twitter hashtag asking women if they have chosen their car trends highly in Saudi Arabia

Granting women the right to drive is part of a wider blueprint for the future.
Updated 24 June 2018
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Twitter hashtag asking women if they have chosen their car trends highly in Saudi Arabia

  • The most visible sign of change is coming Sunday, when women in Saudi Arabia will be allowed to drive
  • A free hand to usher in dramatic moves that are reshaping the country

The Arabic hashtag for “Have you chosen your car?” was linguistically directed to females and was one of the top trending hashtags on Twitter in Saudi Arabia yesterday as locals anticipated this historic day, June 24, the first day when women could drive on the roads of Saudi Arabia.
@GhadeerDk said: “Mercedes S Class 2018 Or Genesis G90.”
@ba_11_ba posted a picture of a Lexus LX570 and tweeted: “My dream car.”
From the region, @medianeminence said: “Seeing Saudi girls contemplate which cars should they get is truly heartwarming.”
@i1i___G said: “Dodge charger 2014.”
Tweeting in Arabic, @Abdullah_Ali_f said: “Legal adviser: Photographing women while they are driving and using this material as a means of mockery, humor and taunting is a violation of the anti-cybercrime law. Whoever commits such acts is subject to no longer than 5 years in prison and a fine that does not exceed SR3 million, or one of the two punishments.”

• Download our free #SaudiWomenCanDrive mobile phone background designed by renowned artist Malika Favre:  https://startyourengines.21wallpaper.design


A hairy issue: Sailors tell the US Navy, ‘We want beards’

Updated 20 July 2018
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A hairy issue: Sailors tell the US Navy, ‘We want beards’

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island: Now that women in the Navy can wear ponytails, men want beards.
The Navy said last week that servicewomen could sport ponytails, lock hairstyles, or ropelike strands, and wider hair buns, reversing a policy that long forbade females from letting their hair down.
Servicemen immediately chimed in on social media, asking the Navy if they could grow beards. A sailor’s Facebook post with a #WeWantBeards hashtag was shared thousands of times.
Beards were banned in 1984. The Navy wanted professional-looking sailors who could wear firefighting masks and breathing apparatuses without interference.
The Navy says that’s still the case. Still, some hope the change in female grooming standards opens the door.
Travis Rader, a 29-year-old naval physical security officer, said allowing beards would boost morale for men, just like allowing ponytails and locks has for women. There are two things that would make many Navy men happy: beards and better boots, he added.
Rader had a 6-inch-long beard when he joined the Navy after high school.
“You take something away from somebody, and they want it more,” said Rader, a master-at-arms assigned to Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma City.
The Navy announced it was adding grooming options for women during a Facebook Live event. Many black women had asked the Navy to be more inclusive of different hair textures. The Navy had the standards in place because of safety concerns and to ensure everyone maintained a uniform, professional look.
Rader was one of several sailors who wrote in the comments section of the Facebook Live event to press for beards. Bill Williams, a 20-year-old naval information systems technician, commented too, asking why sailors can’t have beards if bearded civilian firefighters wear masks.
Williams said he thinks a nice, well-groomed beard looks very professional.
“It’d be great because I know that when I shave for multiple days in a row, it starts to really hurt,” said Williams, who works at the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Hampton Roads in Virginia.
Sailors can get permission to grow a beard for religious reasons or if they have a skin condition that’s irritated by shaving. Mustaches are allowed as long as they are trimmed and neat.
“Handlebar mustaches, goatees, beards or eccentricities are not permitted,” the policy states. The Navy isn’t currently considering changing that.
Safety continues to be the primary concern, said Lt. J.G. Stuart Phillips, a spokesman for the chief of naval personnel. He referenced a 2016 study by the Naval Safety Center, which concluded that facial hair affects the proper fit and performance of respirators.