Gazan dies of wounds from Israel border clash: ministry

The man was killed in clashes two days ago (AFP)
Updated 24 June 2018
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Gazan dies of wounds from Israel border clash: ministry

  • A Palestinian man shot by Israeli forces two days ago during clashes on the Gaza border died of his wounds early Sunday
  • At least 134 Palestinians have been killed in clashes since mass protests broke out along the Gaza border on March 30

GAZA CITY, Palestinian Territories: A Palestinian man shot by Israeli forces two days ago during clashes on the Gaza border died of his wounds early Sunday, the health ministry in the Hamas-ruled territory said.
“Osama Khalil Abu Khater, 29-years-old, died of wounds to his stomach after being shot by the Israeli enemy east of Khan Yunis the day before yesterday,” ministry spokesman Ashraf Al-Qudra said.
Palestinian sources said he was shot during a border clash.
At least 134 Palestinians have been killed in clashes since mass protests broke out along the Gaza border on March 30.
No Israelis have been killed.
The protests peaked on May 14 when at least 62 Palestinians were killed as thousands approached the heavily guarded border fence on the same day the United States moved its Israel embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
Israel says its use of live fire is necessary to defend its borders and stop infiltrations. It accuses Gaza’s Islamist rulers Hamas of seeking to use the protests as cover for attacks.


The consequences of appeasement in the 1930s

British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s ‘piece of paper” in 1938. (Wikimedia Commons)
Updated 22 July 2018
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The consequences of appeasement in the 1930s

DUBAI: The 2015 agreement aimed at curbing Iran’s nuclear program was not the first “piece of paper” to lull the world into a false sense of security.

In September 1938, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain returned to the UK after a meeting in Munich with Nazi leader Adolf Hitler.

The meeting was the culmination of three years of the policy known as “appeasement” — a series of concessions that allowed Hitler to annex Austria, rebuild the German navy and remilitarize the Rhineland, with the eventual aim of dominating Europe.

Supporters of appeasement believed that each new concession made a European war less likely, even as Hitler made his intentions clear.

In the summer of 1938, the Nazi leader sent 750,000 German troops to the German-Czech border as a prelude to the invasion of the Sudetenland, an ethnically German part of Czechoslovakia. Chamberlain flew to Munich for talks, and accepted an assurance from Hitler that, with the Sudetenland incorporated into Germany, his territorial ambitions were at an end.

“I hold in my hand a piece of paper…” Chamberlain told the waiting crowds at Heston aerodrome when he returned to Britain. “I believe it is peace for our time.”

A year later, Germany invaded Poland — and the world embarked on the most destructive war in history.