Singapore spent $12 million on US-North Korea summit

In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, file photo, US President Donald Trump meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Sentosa Island in Singapore. (AP)
Updated 25 June 2018
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Singapore spent $12 million on US-North Korea summit

  • $12 million were spent on the historic US-North Korea summit
  • The meeting was the culmination of a rapid detente between Pyongyang and Washington

SINGAPORE: Singapore said Sunday it spent Sg$16.3 million ($12 million) on the historic US-North Korea summit, adding it was less than initially anticipated after some in the city-state complained about the high cost.
US President Donald Trump and the North’s leader Kim Jong Un met in Singapore on June 12 for talks aimed at ending a tense nuclear standoff.
The meeting was the culmination of a rapid detente between Pyongyang and Washington and saw Kim commit to working toward denuclearization, although critics noted the summit agreement was vague and non-binding.
Singapore, an affluent financial hub, was seen as a good choice for the summit due to its warm ties with both the US and North Korea, and reputation for strict order.
But some Singaporeans thought welcoming the mercurial leaders was more an annoyance than an honor, particularly when Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong estimated the tiny state would have to shell out Sg$20 million ($14.7 million) to host the meeting.
However in the end, the cost incurred by the government was about Sg$16.3 million, the biggest part of which was spent on security, said a ministry of foreign affairs spokesman in a statement.
It noted that Singapore had “supported the international efforts to achieve peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula.”
Tightly-controlled Singapore rolled out a massive security operation for the meeting, deploying thousands of police, setting up road-blocks and banning flares and loudhailers near summit venues to prevent protests.
As well as the security operation, the Singapore government footed the bill for the delegation from the sanctions-hit North, including Kim’s stay at the luxury St. Regis hotel, according to the BBC.
They would have also had to pay a substantial amount for facilities for the huge number of journalists that covered the summit.
The clampdown was disruptive for many residents in the usually placid city-state of 5.6 million — although some observers said hosting the summit amounted to a PR coup that would ultimately benefit Singapore.


Interpol meets to select new president after China’s arrest

Updated 8 min 23 sec ago
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Interpol meets to select new president after China’s arrest

  • Meng Hongwei was also China's vice president of public security
  • Interpol’s annual general assembly began on Sunday and runs until Wednesday

DUBAI: Interpol member-states are gathering in Dubai to select a new president after the agency’s former leader was detained in China.
Meng Hongwei— who was China’s vice minister of public security while also leading Interpol — went missing while on a trip to China in September. It later emerged that the long-time Communist Party insider with decades of experience in China’s security apparatus was detained as part of a wider anti-corruption sweep.
Interpol’s annual general assembly began on Sunday and runs until Wednesday, when member-states will vote on a new president for the coming year.
Interpol member-states will also be deciding whether to accept Kosovo as a full member, which would allow officials there to file red notices of arrest for Serbian officials that Kosovo considers war criminals.