Social media abuzz with celebratory posts

Bahraini and Saudi women celebrate the lifting of the driving ban on women in Saudi Arabia on June 24, 2018. (REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed)
Updated 25 June 2018
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Social media abuzz with celebratory posts

  • In an apparent dig at those who used to oppose women driving in the past, the former imam of Makkah’s Grand Mosque, Adel Al-Kalbani, tweeted: “Aren’t those who said ‘women won’t drive” cute?’”
  • Lebanese model and actress Nadine Njeim shared a touching video congratulating Saudi women. She encouraged them to continue being role models in leadership roles as well.

JEDDAH: Following the lifting of a ban on driving, Saudi women are in a festive mood. On Sunday, many women in the Kingdom with valid driver’s licenses took to roads on their vehicles.

It is a historic reform, which is expected to usher in a new era of prosperity and economic development in the Kingdom.

Social media is abuzz with tweets and posts celebrating this key development. Saudi officials, businessmen and even international celebrities used social media to express their feelings on this historic decision and to congratulate Saudi women on this important day.

Mody Al-Khalaf, a Saudi Shoura Council member, expressed her support to her fellow sisters using Twitter. She tweeted: “It is now 11:59 PM, June 24th in Saudi Arabia. If there ever was a historical 60 seconds, this is it. #ReadySetGo #SaudiWomenDriving”

Top businesswoman Ameera Al-Taweel called on men to extend full support to women and help them achieve their goals in life.

“On such a historic day, I wish to see women being brave and men supporting them. In most countries, we see a ‘New Driver’ sign at the back of every vehicle indicating that the person driving is inexperienced — out of consideration for new drivers. I wish we could all be considerate of other women and realize that this experience is new for them, just to ensure everything goes smoothly for everyone.”

A twitter user Aziz Al-Angari  (@AzizAngari) from Saudi Arabia shared his first experience with an Uber lady driver, Ohoud. “Just requested my first Uber ride from a Saudi female. Thanks for the ride, Ohoud! #SaudiWomenDriving”

In an apparent dig at those who used to oppose women driving in the past, the former imam of Makkah’s Grand Mosque, Adel Al-Kalbani, tweeted: “Aren’t those who said ‘women won’t drive” cute?’”

Former Pakistani cricket player Shoaib Akhtar, also known as the Rawalpindi Express for his lightening bowling spells on the field, tweeted: “Congratulations to all the women in #SaudiArabia #womenempowerment #SaudiWomenDriving.” 

Talli Dar, artist/YouTuber from Toronto tweeted: “Starting today, Saudi women can finally drive. They’ve officially been issued their licenses and can start racing Saudi men on the streets and see who’s the Fastest & Most Furious. Historic moment #SaudiWomenDriving.”

Lebanese model and actress Nadine Njeim shared a touching video congratulating Saudi women. She encouraged them to continue being role models in leadership roles as well.

“Every woman in the Arab world and especially in Saudi Arabia – today is your day, today you achieved greatness because you trusted in yourself, your strength and abilities.”

 Hiba Tawaji, the Lebanese soprano singer, also released a video to congratulate Saudi women by sharing a song she performed live in Riyadh on Dec. 7, 2017. She said: “Today women in Saudi Arabia can legally drive their cars. Congratulations!”


Facebook suspends Boston analytics firm over data usage

In this Oct. 15, 2013, file photo, Chuck Goolsbee, site director for Facebook's Prineville data centers, shows the computer servers that store users' photos and other data, at the Facebook site in Prineville, Ore. (AP)
Updated 21 July 2018
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Facebook suspends Boston analytics firm over data usage

  • Facebook said Friday that Crimson Hexagon is cooperating and that so far its investigation hasn’t found evidence that the firm obtained Facebook or Instagram information inappropriately

NEW YORK: Facebook said Friday that it has suspended Boston-based analytics firm Crimson Hexagon while it investigates how it collects and shares Facebook and Instagram’s user data.
Facebook has been facing increased scrutiny over how third-party firms use its data since news broke in March that data firm Cambridge Analytica improperly accessed user data.
The Wall Street Journal first reported that Facebook had suspended Crimson Hexagon. The newspaper says among the firm’s clients is a Russian nonprofit with ties to the Kremlin.
“We don’t allow developers to build surveillance tools using information from Facebook or Instagram,” said Ime Archibong, Facebook’s vice president of product partnerships. “We take these allegations seriously, and we have suspended these apps while we investigate.”
Facebook said Friday that Crimson Hexagon is cooperating and that so far its investigation hasn’t found evidence that the firm obtained Facebook or Instagram information inappropriately.
Crimson Hexagon says on its website it has access to over one trillion consumer conversations from social media, forums, blogs and reviews.
In a blog posting , Crimson Hexagon Chief Technology Officer Chris Bingham said the company “abides completely” by the rules social media sites including Twitter and Facebook put in place to limit the ways third-party companies can use their data.
He said the firm only collects publicly available social media data. He contrasted that with Cambridge Analytica’s use of private user data.
Users of Crimson Hexagon’s platform, which include government customers, analyze the data to understand large-scale consumer trends and preferences, Bingham wrote.
“Government entities that leverage the Crimson Hexagon platform do so for the same reasons as many of our other non-government customers: a broad-based and aggregate understanding of the public’s perception, preferences and sentiment about matters of concern to them,” he wrote.