Oman’s expat visa ban extended on certain jobs

A view of Oman's capital Muscat in the evening. (Shutterstock)
Updated 25 June 2018
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Oman’s expat visa ban extended on certain jobs

DUBAI: Oman’s temporary visa ban on hiring expatriates in specific jobs has been extended for another six months according to the country’s Ministry of Manpower, local daily Times of Oman reported.
“The period of the ban on permits to bring temporary expatriate manpower into private sector establishments for the professions specified in Ministerial Decision No. 38/2018 shall continue for a period of six months from July 30, 2018,” a statement from the ministry read.
Meanwhile Oman’s Royal Police (ROP) also announced that expats who work in government agencies are now able to sponsor visa applicants.
Expats who own specific properties in the country are also allowed to receive a visa without a sponsor.
“This means that expatriates will be able to become sponsors of their own family members as long as they meet certain conditions,” the statement from ROP read.
Earlier this year, the Omani government imposed the initial six month ban on expat workers getting visas for jobs in 87 industries, including media, engineering, marketing and sales, accounting and finance, IT, insurance, technicians, administration and HR.
The Omanization drive is part of a government’s push to recruit more of its citizens, a similar push is underway across the GCC where countries like Saudi Arabia and Kuwait have also been trying to increase the number of locals in employment.


Pakistan in final round of talks with IMF over bailout deal

Updated 46 min 54 sec ago
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Pakistan in final round of talks with IMF over bailout deal

  • Finance Minister Asad Umar acknowledged the two sides have differences and that the talks may not end on Tuesday
  • Pakistan has been approaching the IMF since 1980s and received a $6.7 billion loan in 2013
ISLAMABAD: Pakistan and the International Monetary Fund are into their final round of talks over an $8 billion bailout package Islamabad seeks from the international lending agency to overcome the country’s economic woes.
Finance Minister Asad Umar acknowledged the two sides have differences and that the talks may not end on Tuesday.
Authorities say they are still at odds over electricity rate hikes, as well as interest rate hikes and tax collection targets, and that the IMF is looking for more than Pakistan’s new government feels it can manage.
Pakistan has been approaching the IMF since 1980s and received a $6.7 billion loan in 2013. It’s also seeking fresh loans from China, which has already heavily invested in transport and energy, as well as Saudi Arabia and some other Muslim countries.