Bella Hadid reacts as Drake’s album fuels romance rumors

Bella Hadid was quick to deny the rumors. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 30 June 2018
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Bella Hadid reacts as Drake’s album fuels romance rumors

DUBAI: Canadian rapper Drake set the Internet alight on Friday when he dropped his latest album, “Scorpion.”
Spotify said the album was streaming at an average rate of 10 million times an hour on Friday, while Apple Music said it was the No. 1 streamed album in 92 countries.
On the 25-track double album, Drake, 31, confirms long-standing rumors that he has fathered a son, but does not name the mother.
However, that’s not the only thing he reveals about his private life.
In the track “Finesse,” Drake raps: “I want my baby to have your eyes, I’m going against my own advice / Should I do New York? I can’t decide / Fashion Week is more your thing than mine.”
Social media users were quick to speculate that the lyrics referred to a rumored former romance with US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid, not least because of the line, “You stay on my mind / You and your sister too hot to handle.”

Fans theorized that Drake was referring to Bella and her equally famous sister, Gigi.

However, Bella took those commenters to task and responded to the claims on Twitter almost as soon as the album came out, saying: “Not me!! That’s disrespectful. WHY CAN’T PPL BE FRIENDS w/o all the insinuation (sic).”


The album marks Drake’s comeback after an infamous diss track was released a month ago by rapper Pusha T, in which he first revealed that Drake has a secret child.
Damien Scott, Complex’s editor-in-chief and vice president of content and development, told the Associated Press that he thought Drake might have gone back in the studio to re-record “Scorpion” following Pusha T’s shocking revelation — “A baby’s involved, it’s deeper than rap/We talkin’ character, let me keep with the facts/You are hiding a child, let that boy come home,” Pusha T rapped on the track.
Scott may have been right. For the first time Drake addresses his son in a song, rapping on “Emotionless:” “I wasn’t hiding my kid from the world, I was hiding the world from my kid.” On the closing track, “March 14,” he raps about being a single father and says: “She’s not my lover like Billie Jean, but the kid is mine.”
“Scorpion,” which features songs with Jay-Z and a previously unreleased Michael Jackson track, includes the massive No. 1 hits “God’s Plan” and “Nice for What.” It follows Drake’s best-selling 2016 album “Views” and his 2017 release “More Life,” which set a record across all music streaming services of 385 million streams in its first week of release.
The Recording Industry Association of America said on Friday that Drake had become its top digital song artist, with 142 million digital single sales units, ahead of Rihanna and Taylor Swift.
Drake’s latest offering is a joint release on Warner Bros. and Universal Music-owned labels OVO Sound, Young Money Entertainment, Cash Money Records and Republic Records, Reuters reported.


Saudi film industry heralds new dawn with opening of first arthouse cinema

Updated 13 min 32 sec ago
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Saudi film industry heralds new dawn with opening of first arthouse cinema

  • Cinema El-Housh is the brainchild of Saudi film director, producer and screenwriter Mahmoud Sabbagh and the event will continue until July 25 as part of the Jeddah Season festival
  • Mahmoud Sabbagh: We chose old Jeddah because the phenomena existed here, and the idea of an arthouse film isn’t new

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s blossoming film industry on Tuesday heralded a new dawn with the launch of the Kingdom’s first arthouse cinema.

The outdoor Cinema El-Housh opened in the historic city of Jeddah with the screening of director Stanley Kubrick’s celebrated “2001: A Space Odyssey” to mark the movie’s 51st anniversary.

The project is the brainchild of Saudi film director, producer and screenwriter Mahmoud Sabbagh and the event will continue until July 25 as part of the Jeddah Season festival.

“Cinema El-Housh is one of the first proper arthouses for film theater initiatives in Saudi Arabia and in Jeddah,” Sabbagh told Arab News.

“The idea of the cinema comes from outdoor cinemas, which was a phenomenon that existed in old Jeddah from the 1940s until the end of the 1970s, where people gathered in courtyards where they would screen a film and enjoy it.

“We are bringing that back to the community with all its minimalism and gestures for bringing people together and bringing the communal experience of watching films again,” he said.

“We chose old Jeddah because the phenomena existed here, and the idea of an arthouse film isn’t new. It really strikes a balance between a commercial cinema and non-commercial cinemas.

“With the opening of cinemas, we are witnessing a burst of commercial-driven cinema multiplexes. However, there was a void someone had to fill by introducing this idea of arthouse cinemas,” added Sabbagh.

“We are free to screen films that are of non-commercial value, non-mainstream, more independent films that are film festival frequent and classics, and Saudi films. We want to be a platform for all the emerging Saudi voices.”

 

Tuesday’s private screening of “2001: A Space Odyssey” was also attended by Saudi actor Khaled Yeslam who said the film’s message conveyed the dawning of a new era in the Kingdom.

“From my perspective, choosing “2001: A Space Odyssey,” it started with the new dawn of mankind. And the music played was the music we listened to in the 1980s and 1990s,” Yeslam told Arab News.

“So, seeing such an entry as a film in Al-Balad, it’s a metaphor itself; here in Al-Balad, in Jeddah, in Saudi Arabia itself. I thought it was planned and that he meant to do that. And I think Mahmoud is such a genius for choosing such a film.”

On the Kingdom’s booming film industry, Yeslam said: “Through movies, it’s finally our (Saudis) time to tell our stories. We’re fed up with the stereotypes and double standards by Western media and it’s time to reveal our reality.

“In the end, we’re just human, we’re just like everyone else, and I believe that art is a way to connect with others as humans.”

FACTOID

Outdoor cinemas existed in Jeddah from the 1940s until the late 1970s.