Yemeni minister: Houthi violations kill 5 Hodeidah port staff

A general view shows the port of the Yemeni city of Hodeidah on June 24, 2018. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 02 July 2018
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Yemeni minister: Houthi violations kill 5 Hodeidah port staff

  • The deputy minister stated that Houthi control of Hodeidah and the port has “exacerbated the humanitarian crisis and increased the suffering of Yemeni people”
  • 11 Yemeni political parties called on the international community to support efforts to restore the province of Hodeidah in full and the departure of the Iranian-backed Houthi militia

DUBAI: A Yemeni government official claimed that Houthi crimes and violations against staff working at the Hodeidah port caused the death of five workers, the Saudi press agency reported on Sunday.

Deputy Minister of Transport, Nasser Sharif, said that the since Houthis took over of the port of Hodeidah three years ago, militias abused staff and committed violations against them, including replacing staff members with members from their militia who lack basics of navigational work.

In a statement broadcast by the Yemeni official news agency, he said that the aim of these violations was to take control of the port and smuggle arms into the country.  

Sharif added that the militias have taken the port’s revenues and used them for their military efforts.

The deputy minister stated that Houthi control of Hodeidah and the port has “exacerbated the humanitarian crisis and increased the suffering of Yemeni people.”

Meanwhile, 11 Yemeni political parties called on the international community to support efforts to restore the province of Hodeidah in full and the departure of the Iranian-backed Houthi militia, including the protection of civilians in accordance with Security Council resolutions.

In a statement, the parties expressed their appreciation for the efforts of UN envoy Martin Griffiths and his commitments to restart peace talks.  

The parties stressed the need to adhere to the political solution and for the Houthis to withdraw from governmental institutions and surrender weapons to the internationally recognized government, as well as release prisoners, abductees.


Detainee allegedly tortured in Sudan dies

Updated 26 min 36 sec ago
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Detainee allegedly tortured in Sudan dies

  • The man died on Saturday in the town of Dilling in the state of South Kordofan after he was detained by agents of the feared National Intelligence and Security Service
  • It was NISS that led a sweeping crackdown on protests against Bashir’s rule that first erupted in December

KHARTOUM: A Sudanese civilian detained and allegedly tortured by security agents in a central town has died in custody, a doctors committee linked to the country’s protest movement said Sunday.
The man died on Saturday in the town of Dilling in the state of South Kordofan after he was detained by agents of the feared National Intelligence and Security Service (NISS), the doctors committee said in a statement.
The detainee “passed away on July 20, 2019 from torture while in detention at the NISS office in Dilling,” the statement said without elaborating on the circumstances of his arrest.
“NISS continues to torture and claim innocent civilian lives illegally without facing any consequences.”
Officers of NISS were not immediately available for comment.
Rights groups and activists had regularly accused NISS agents of cracking down on dissidents and restricting freedoms during the regime of veteran leader Omar Al-Bashir who was ousted in April.
It was NISS that led a sweeping crackdown on protests against Bashir’s rule that first erupted in December.
Dozens were killed and hundreds of protesters, activists and opposition leaders were arrested during the months-long campaign that led to Bashir’s overthrow and subsequent demonstrations calling for civilian rule.
Last week a power-sharing deal was inked between the protest leaders and the ruling generals who seized power after ousting Bashir.
More talks between the two sides to thrash out some pending issues have been suspended following differences within the protest movement itself over the power-sharing deal.