Ivory Coast studies first cocoa-fired power station

A farmer works at a cocoa farm at Guire, a village of Soubre, in southwestern Ivory Coast. The west African country plans to build a power station fired by cocoa production waste. (Reuters)
Updated 03 July 2018
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Ivory Coast studies first cocoa-fired power station

  • Ivory Coast cocoa production waste amounts to 26 million tons mainly pods from which the beans have been extracted
  • The plant would be built in the center of the west African nation at Divo and generate 60-70 megawatts

ABIDJAN: Abidjan wants to build the world’s first biomass power station fired by cocoa production waste, Ivory Coast and US officials said Monday.
If the €235-million ($273-million) scheme gets the go-ahead, Ivory Coast, the world’s top cocoa grower, could go on to construct nine more power stations burning cocao waste.
The first plant could be up and running in 2023, said Yapi Ogou, the head of the Société des énergies nouvelles (Soden or New Energies Company) which is in charge of the project.
The US Trade and Development Agency (USTDA) has financed a million dollars of feasibility studies which should be completed by next April.
Ivory Coast cocoa production waste amounts to 26 million tons, mainly pods from which the beans have been extracted, Ogou said.
The plant would be built in the center of the west African nation at Divo and generate 60-70 megawatts, he added.
Ivory Coast currently generates 2,200 MW but strong economic growth has put a strain on supplies.
The new cocoa waste plant would also save the equivalent of 250,000 tons of carbon di-oxide emissions, Ogou said.
A US trade delegation led by under secretary of commerce Gilbert Kaplan is visiting Ivory Coast and USTDA has re-opened an office in Abidjan after a 16-year gap.
Abidjan’s commerce minister Souleymane Diarrassouba said trade between the two countries had expanded 55 percent from 2012-2017 to reach 1.8 billion dollars.
Setting a target of three billion dollars by 2025, he urged US business “to invest massively in Ivory Coast.”


Passenger numbers rise at Dubai International Airport

Updated 54 min 34 sec ago
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Passenger numbers rise at Dubai International Airport

  • Operator welcomes monthly jump after travel decline in past year
  • Dubai Airports launched its Strategic Plan 2020 in 2011 with the aim of increasing passenger capacity from 60 million a year to 90 million by 2018

LONDON: The number of passengers passing through Dubai International Airport rose by 2.1 percent in October compared with the same month last year, the operator Dubai Airports said on Monday.

The increase follows a drop in passenger traffic in September and a wider slowdown in the number of travelers passing through the emirate’s airport over the past year.

“Dubai International has been on record stating that passenger growth would be somewhat lower than in previous years, so this current performance is in line with my expectations,” said aviation analyst Saj Ahmad from Strategic Aero Research.

“That said, the airport has still grown over 2017 and will likely eclipse its 2018 target of handling over 90 million passengers and remain the world’s busiest international airport,” he said.

Dubai Airports CEO Paul Griffiths told a conference in Dubai last month that he expected just over 90 million passengers to use the airport this year, according to Reuters.

A total of 7 million passengers used the airport in October, compared with 6.9 million in the same month last year.

In September, passenger traffic fell by 0.2 percent compared with the previous year. The decline was blamed on the Eid Al-Adha holiday — with an associated spike in travel — falling in September last year.

Total passenger traffic in 2017 rose by just 5.5 percent year-on-year to reach 88.24 million people. This is a slower rate of growth than the 7.2 percent increase in 2015-16 and the 10.7 percent jump recorded between 2014-2015.

Dubai Airports launched its Strategic Plan 2020 in 2011 with the aim of increasing passenger capacity from 60 million a year to 90 million by 2018.

Under the strategy, the number of airport stands has been increased and terminal buildings expanded.

As demand grows, further work on the airport’s infrastructure will be needed, said Ahmad.

“Demand is not infinite — the airport is operating at nearly 98 percent capacity, so it stands to reason that only so much growth can be absorbed,” he said.

DXB handled 237,499 tons of cargo in October, a 2.5 percent increase on the previous month. Overall cargo volumes have fallen year-to-date by 0.9 percent to 2.1 million tons.