Nora Attal walks the runway for Dior in Paris

Models present creations by Christian Dior at the end of the 2018-2019 Fall/Winter Haute Couture collection fashion show in Paris, on July 2, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 03 July 2018
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Nora Attal walks the runway for Dior in Paris

DUBAI: British-Moroccan model Nora Attal took to the runway during Christian Dior’s Fall/Winter Haute Couture show in Paris on Monday.
The 18-year-old, who landed a coveted British Vogue cover in 2017, showed off a silver jacquard dress and posted on Instagram shortly after the show, saying: “This collection was especially beautiful.”

Dior paid tribute to the skills of its ateliers at its runway show as models in pale, minimalistic gowns glided through an all-white showroom-turned-catwalk lined with mannequins.
A palette of powdery colors dominated the looks, with some gowns in dusty pink evoking soft ballerina costumes, in a collection that designer Maria Grazia Chiuri described as a focus on craft over flashy fashion, Reuters reported.
The surrounding mannequins, stacked to the ceiling and wearing prototypes of dresses, added a glimpse of the behind-the-scenes feel of the show.
“We are in this time where the idea of couture sometimes is wrong because people believe that couture is expensive so it has to be visible. We have to try to explain that couture is another story,” Chiuri said backstage after the show, staged in the gardens of the Rodin museum.
Models, some wearing berets with veils, hit the runway in an array of understated evening dresses in sandy pinks and oranges, while some donned skin-colored, see-through gowns. Others were adorned in dusty pink flowers.
Only a handful of houses are officially allowed to style themselves “Haute Couture” with a number of major brands including Louis Vuitton and Saint Laurent absent from the club.
To qualify, houses have to be approved by French fashion’s governing body and fulfil criteria covering staffing, skills and the service offered to private clients.
Model Karlie Kloss and actresses Katie Holmes and Kate Bosworth were among the stars sitting in the front row, and Bosworth said the craftsmanship was plain to see.
“(It) is just a tremendous amount of work and attention so I really appreciate it from that point of view,” she said.
Lebanese fashion blogger Lana El-Sahely was also part of the well-heeled crowd, as was French-Algerian actress Sofia Boutella.
“Paris! Feels so good to be back. Kicked off couture week with @dior, always a dream to be at the show,” El-Sahely posted on Instagram after the show.
Despite the blogger’s excitement, Chiuri said she wanted the French label’s latest prestige range to glorify classic craftsmanship rather than the flashy designs that rack up “likes” on social media.
“It’s hidden luxury,” the Italian explained as the collection went on show before the global fashion elite in Paris.
“The audience that buys couture is not an audience that spends its time on Instagram,” she told AFP.
Paris Haute Couture Week runs until July 5.
French label Givenchy, another brand which like Dior is owned by LVMH, also celebrated its ateliers at its show on Sunday, as designer Clare Waight Keller appeared at the end of the presentation alongside the team of couturiers.
Waight Keller is also known for designing the long-sleeved, boat necked gown that Meghan Markle wore for her wedding to Prince Harry.


Dolce & Gabbana cancels China show after racial row

Updated 21 November 2018
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Dolce & Gabbana cancels China show after racial row

  • ‘Foreign companies operating in China should respect China and respect Chinese people’
  • ‘We are very sorry for any distress caused by these unauthorized posts. We have nothing but respect for China and the people of China’

BEIJING: Dolce & Gabbana canceled a long-planned fashion show in Shanghai Wednesday after an outcry over racially offensive posts on its social media accounts, a setback for the company in the world’s most important luxury market.
The Italian fashion house quickly issued a statement apologizing and saying the accounts as well as that of its namesake designer Stefano Gabbana had been hacked, but it did little to calm a brewing social media uproar in China.
Some of China’s biggest celebrities had been billed to attend the “Great Show” event, but on Wednesday one after another announced their withdrawal.
“Our mother country is more important than anything, we appreciate the vigor and beauty of our cultural heritage,” said the management of Wang Junkai, a hugely popular singer in boyband TFBoys, as they announced his withdrawal.
“I love my mother country,” actress Li Bingbing told her 42 million fans on Weibo.
The controversy arose after Dolce & Gabbana posted short clips on Instagram earlier this week showing a woman eating pizza and spaghetti with chopsticks that some deemed culturally insensitive.
It erupted into a firestorm after screenshots circulated of an Instagram user’s chat with the famously volatile Stefano Gabbana in which he used five smiling poop emojis to talk about China and launched insults at the country and its people.
Even China’s Communist Youth League jumped into the fray.
“Foreign companies operating in China should respect China and respect Chinese people,” the youth league tweeted to Dolce & Gabbana on Weibo.
Actor Talu Wang also tweeted on Weibo: “Respect is more important than anything.”
As the backlash escalated, Dolce & Gabbana took to Instagram and Weibo saying its account and that of designer Stefano Gabbana had been hacked and that its legal office was “urgently investigating” the matter.
“We are very sorry for any distress caused by these unauthorized posts. We have nothing but respect for China and the people of China,” the company said on Instagram.
Dolce & Gabbana said separately on its verified Weibo account that the show “has been rescheduled,” though it did not specify the reason nor did it give a new date for the event.
“We apologize for the inconvenience,” it said.
The controversy marks the latest backpedaling by a foreign company for offending Chinese consumers with advertising or information that insults China or clashes with Beijing’s official position.
Earlier this year, German automaker Mercedes-Benz apologized for “hurting the feelings” of people in China after its Instagram account quoted Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama, seen as a separatist by Beijing.