Three YouTube travel vloggers killed in Canada waterfall plunge

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This handout photo obtained July 6, 2018 courtesy of BC Parks shows the 335-meter-high (1,100-foot) Shannon Falls, 50 kilometers (30 miles) from the Pacific coast city of Vancouver, British Columbia. (AFP)
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This handout photo obtained July 6, 2018 courtesy of BC Parks shows the 335-meter-high (1,100-foot) Shannon Falls, 50 kilometers (30 miles) from the Pacific coast city of Vancouver, British Columbia. (AFP)
Updated 07 July 2018
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Three YouTube travel vloggers killed in Canada waterfall plunge

  • Lyakh and Gamble lost their footing while trying to help Scraper after she slipped into the surging waters of Shannon Creek
  • Gamble, the group’s leader, served a short prison sentence in 2016 after filming from a restricted area of Yellowstone National Park in the western US

MONTREAL: Thousands were mourning Friday on social media after the freak deaths of three adventurous young video bloggers who suffered fatal injuries after slipping in a powerful river above a waterfall in western Canada.
The three childhood companions — Ryker Gamble, Alexey Lyakh and Megan Scraper — had joined friends on an outing to 335-meter-high (1,100-foot) Shannon Falls, 50 kilometers (30 miles) from the Pacific coast city of Vancouver, British Columbia.
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) said the three were “swimming in one of the pools at the top of Shannon Falls” when “they slipped and fell into a pool 30 meters below.”
Lyakh and Gamble lost their footing while trying to help Scraper after she slipped into the surging waters of Shannon Creek, according to witnesses quoted by the Vancouver Sun.
Rescue teams working on the ground and by helicopter were unable to find and recover the three bodies until Wednesday evening.
The RCMP noted in a statement that the terrain around the falls was “extremely difficult, very dangerous,” with a “heavy” water flow.
The victims, all Canadians in their late 20s or early 30s, had gained fame in 2011 after creating a YouTube channel called “High on Life.”
More than 500,000 subscribers there — and another one million on Instagram — followed their often-risky adventures, which sometimes defied basic rules of safety.
Gamble, the group’s leader, served a short prison sentence in 2016 after filming from a restricted area of Yellowstone National Park in the western US.
On Friday, seven of their friends posted a video homage on the trio’s YouTube page in an effort to raise $100,000 toward funeral costs. Within hours the video had been viewed by more than 150,000 people and people had posted more than 1,600 messages of condolence.
“Not only were they everyone’s friend, but they were genuinely nice guys to their core,” friend Rose Huet told the Vancouver Sun.
Homages were posted on Twitter and Facebook, with the hashtag #HOLInspired.
“They will be missed greatly,” Melissa Devane posted on Facebook. “The High on Life group inspired me to travel and reach for the goals that once seemed impossible.”


Facebook’s Zuckerberg: No plans to resign

Updated 21 November 2018
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Facebook’s Zuckerberg: No plans to resign

  • Facebook has stumbled from one mess to another this year
  • Zuckerberg defended his company against the broader wave of flak it has taken this year

WASHINGTON: Embattled Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Tuesday he has no plans to resign, sounding defiant after a rough year for the social platform.
“That’s not the plan,” Zuckerberg told CNN Business when asked if he would consider stepping down as chairman.
He also defended Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg, who has drawn criticism over her handling of the social media giant’s recent crises.
“Sheryl is a really important part of this company and is leading a lot of the efforts for a lot of the biggest issues we have,” said Zuckerberg.
“She’s been an important partner to me for 10 years. I’m really proud of the work we’ve done together and I hope that we work together for decades more to come.”
Facebook has stumbled from one mess to another this year as it grappled with continuing fallout from Russia’s use of the platform to interfere in the 2016 US presidential election, the Cambridge Analytica scandal in which user data was harnessed in a bid to help candidate Donald Trump, and a huge security breach involving millions of accounts.
Most recently, an investigative piece published last week by The New York Times said Facebook misled the public about what it knew about Russia’s election meddling and used a PR firm to spread negative stories about other Silicon Valley companies and thus deflect anger away from itself.
“It is not clear to me at all that the report is right,” Zuckerberg said of the Times article.
“A lot of the things that were in that report, we talked to the reporters ahead of time and told them that from everything that we’d seen, that wasn’t true and they chose to print it anyway.”
Zuckerberg also defended his company against the broader wave of flak it has taken this year.
“A lot of the criticism around the biggest issues has been fair, but I do think that if we are going to be real, there is this bigger picture as well, which is that we have a different world view than some of the folks who are covering us,” he said.
“There are big issues, and I’m not trying to say that there aren’t ... But I do think that sometimes, you can get the flavor from some of the coverage that that’s all there is, and I don’t think that that’s right either.”