We will return to Pakistan on Friday, says Maryam Nawaz Sharif

Nawaz Sharif (R), former Prime Minister and leader of Pakistan Muslim League, gestures to supporters as his daughter Maryam Nawaz looks on during party's workers convention in Islamabad, Pakistan on June 4, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 07 July 2018
0

We will return to Pakistan on Friday, says Maryam Nawaz Sharif

  • ‘If national responsibility is calling and people of Pakistan believe that Nawaz Sharif is needed at this moment, he will prefer his national duty to personal one’

ISLAMABAD: Former prime minister Nawaz Sharif’s daughter has announced in London that she and her father will return to Pakistan on Friday.

Talking to a group of journalists on Saturday, Maryam Nawaz pointed out that she had accompanied her father to Britain to see her ailing mother.

She added that doctors had given them hope that Kalsoom Nawaz would gradually regain consciousness in the next couple of days.

“If national responsibility is calling and people of Pakistan believe that Nawaz Sharif is needed at this moment, he will prefer his national duty to personal one,” she said. “He will return to Pakistan on Friday – and so will I.”

Making an oblique reference to Pakistan’s former president-general, Pervez Musharraf, who fled the country to avoid an ongoing treason trial against him, Maryam said that her father was a “commando without training” who believed in fighting for his principles and did not fear anyone but God.

She added that Nawaz Sharif was not like those who only claimed they were not afraid of anyone. “He has practically proved that a person who truly leads the masses does not get scared so easily.”

Discussing the recent verdict of the anti-graft tribunal against her family, she said there were “so many contradictions in it” that it would be overturned if the appeal went to “a fair judge who is not part of this conspiracy” against the Sharif family.

Meanwhile, leaders of Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) party in the country have also decided to give a warm welcome to the former prime minister and his daughter upon their return to the country.


Afghan forces kill seven civilians in attack on militants

Updated 26 min 19 sec ago
0

Afghan forces kill seven civilians in attack on militants

  • The seven civilians, including women and children, were killed in Logar province, just south of Kabul, on Sunday night
  • Afghan forces, backed by US advisers, have in recent months stepped up their air strikes and raids to the highest levels since 2014

KABUL: Afghan government forces mistakenly killed seven civilians, including children, in an attack on militants south of the capital, a provincial official said on Monday, the latest victims of a war undiminished by peace talks.
Government forces, have been facing Taliban attacks across much of the country, and have responded with air strikes aimed at killing insurgent leaders, even as US and Afghan representatives have been negotiating with the militants in Qatar.
The seven civilians, including women and children, were killed in Logar province, just south of Kabul, on Sunday night said Hasib Stanekzai, a member of Logar’s provincial council. Six people were wounded, he said.
Provincial police confirmed the attack on militants by government forces but said they were investigating the casualties.
“According to our initial information a number of militants were killed or wounded, but local people gathered in the area, claiming that a house belonging to a Kuchi family had been bombed, causing civilian casualties,” said Shahpor Ahmadzai, a spokesman for Logar police.
Kuchi are nomadic herders, but some now live in permanent settlements.
Ahmadzai, who said police were investigating, also said foreign forces were involved in the attack on the militants. Officials with Afghanistan’s NATO force were not immediately available to confirm or deny their involvement in the operation.
Afghan forces, backed by US advisers, have in recent months stepped up their air strikes and raids to the highest levels since 2014.
The latest phase of Afghanistan’s war — which began when US-backed forces the overthrew the Taliban following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States — has intensified despite the most sustained peace talks of the war.
The United Nations has repeatedly expressed concern about civilian casualties, which reached their highest level last year since detailed accounting began nearly a decade ago.
The war claimed 3,804 civilian lives in 2018, that included 927 children, both figures all-time highs, representing an 11% increase in civilian deaths compared with 2017, UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan said in February.