Sonia Ben Ammar and Halima Aden walk for Dolce & Gabbana

Sonia Ben Ammar walked the runway. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 08 July 2018
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Sonia Ben Ammar and Halima Aden walk for Dolce & Gabbana

DUBAI: It was a lavish affair on the banks of Italy’s Lake Como as Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana presented their 100-look Alta Moda collection over the weekend.
The sumptuous line was modelled by a glittering line-up of famous faces, including Somali-American model Halima Aden, Tunisian beauty Sonia Ben Ammar, British rapper Tinie Tempah, American model and current Vogue Arabia cover star Ashley Graham and the legend that is Naomi Campbell.
British aristocrat Lady Kitty Spencer, who caused quite a stir at the recent royal wedding with her floral Dolce & Gabbana dress, and 70-year-old Canadian-South African model Maye Musk were also among those to sashay their way through Teresio Olivelli park, while the beautifully suited men strode through the opulent Villa Carlotta.
“It’s not about one reference,” Dolce told Vogue US backstage. “Maybe you can find seven different references in one outfit. Nothing is old, and nothing is new.” “Today there are too many people in fashion talking about nothing much,” Gabbana added to the magazine. “At the end of the day it is just about clothes and emotion. So, we don’t plan anything and we change the clothes during the fittings according to how they work on the models.”
While Campbell was the undisputed star of the show in a rainforest-themed, full-skirted ball gown, Aden and Ammar modelled more classic looks that were immediately identifiable as hailing from the Italian design house.
The Renaissance-inspired gowns would not look out of place in the hallowed halls of a museum gallery, with Ammar showing off a stunning fern green gown with petals cascading down from her hair and Aden boasting a crimson-and-black, feather-lined piece worthy of a Disney villainess.

Aden walked the runway with a gem-encrusted tiara atop her hijab, days after revealing that she had her veil built into her modeling contract.
In an interview with CBS News last week, she said that she addressed personal concerns about modesty in her contract with IMG Models.

“When I got that opportunity to sign with IMG Models, I made sure I wasn’t conforming,” she said. “Our first-ever sit-down was four hours, and I did it on my own terms. Every time I go on set, I know that the people who are doing the shoot already know my requirements. They know what I can wear, they already have an understanding, and I’ve always felt safe.”


Dolce & Gabbana cancels China show after racial row

Updated 21 November 2018
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Dolce & Gabbana cancels China show after racial row

  • ‘Foreign companies operating in China should respect China and respect Chinese people’
  • ‘We are very sorry for any distress caused by these unauthorized posts. We have nothing but respect for China and the people of China’

BEIJING: Dolce & Gabbana canceled a long-planned fashion show in Shanghai Wednesday after an outcry over racially offensive posts on its social media accounts, a setback for the company in the world’s most important luxury market.
The Italian fashion house quickly issued a statement apologizing and saying the accounts as well as that of its namesake designer Stefano Gabbana had been hacked, but it did little to calm a brewing social media uproar in China.
Some of China’s biggest celebrities had been billed to attend the “Great Show” event, but on Wednesday one after another announced their withdrawal.
“Our mother country is more important than anything, we appreciate the vigor and beauty of our cultural heritage,” said the management of Wang Junkai, a hugely popular singer in boyband TFBoys, as they announced his withdrawal.
“I love my mother country,” actress Li Bingbing told her 42 million fans on Weibo.
The controversy arose after Dolce & Gabbana posted short clips on Instagram earlier this week showing a woman eating pizza and spaghetti with chopsticks that some deemed culturally insensitive.
It erupted into a firestorm after screenshots circulated of an Instagram user’s chat with the famously volatile Stefano Gabbana in which he used five smiling poop emojis to talk about China and launched insults at the country and its people.
Even China’s Communist Youth League jumped into the fray.
“Foreign companies operating in China should respect China and respect Chinese people,” the youth league tweeted to Dolce & Gabbana on Weibo.
Actor Talu Wang also tweeted on Weibo: “Respect is more important than anything.”
As the backlash escalated, Dolce & Gabbana took to Instagram and Weibo saying its account and that of designer Stefano Gabbana had been hacked and that its legal office was “urgently investigating” the matter.
“We are very sorry for any distress caused by these unauthorized posts. We have nothing but respect for China and the people of China,” the company said on Instagram.
Dolce & Gabbana said separately on its verified Weibo account that the show “has been rescheduled,” though it did not specify the reason nor did it give a new date for the event.
“We apologize for the inconvenience,” it said.
The controversy marks the latest backpedaling by a foreign company for offending Chinese consumers with advertising or information that insults China or clashes with Beijing’s official position.
Earlier this year, German automaker Mercedes-Benz apologized for “hurting the feelings” of people in China after its Instagram account quoted Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama, seen as a separatist by Beijing.