Spotting a woman out in the street driving still a rarity in KSA

People are keeping count of how many women they have seen driving. AFP
Updated 09 July 2018
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Spotting a woman out in the street driving still a rarity in KSA

  • More than 120,000 women have applied or expressed interest in obtaining a license so far

RIYADH: Ever since June 24, when the ban on women driving was lifted, many Saudis have been trying their luck at spotting an actual woman behind the wheel.
People are keeping count of how many they’ve seen driving.
As the number is still low, it’s become something of a phenomenon to spot one on the busy streets of Riyadh.
“People are joking that women drivers are like the Pokémon game: Rare to spot and everyone is looking out for them,” said Mozon S, a mother of three, who has registered at the Saudi driving school at Princess Noura University. She started taking lessons this week.
“The number of ladies that have received their driving licenses do not compare to the amount of men who already have theirs. Therefore, the number of women taking to the streets is relatively low.”
“A lot of men are saying look, women don’t want to drive, we haven’t seen any so far,” Mozon said.
“But if they go to women driving schools and they see the ladies registering for a license, they will be surprised by the sheer number. Women by nature are responsible. This matter is no different to them. They know driving is a responsibility, which should be taken seriously and through legal means.”
“So far, I’ve only seen one lady drive at the Bahrain and Khobar intersection.” said Noor Musheiykh, an architect.
“I was shocked. It felt weird, and I laughed afterwards. It’s because this is new, and we haven’t seen it, yet. The number of licenses issued for ladies is small, but them driving is giving off positive vibes!”
More than 120,000 women have applied or expressed interest in obtaining a license so far. Which would explain the small number of women on the streets.


Saudi communications minister receives youngest Saudi female journalist

Updated 19 July 2018
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Saudi communications minister receives youngest Saudi female journalist

RIYADH: Saudi Minister of Communications and Information Technology, Abdullah Al-Sawah stressed the Kingdom's need to discover and support local talent.
He said that the ministry has paid increasing attention to technical talents, which has been represented through the organization of several events, the latest of which was the "Hackathon Digital Machines."
The event was aimed at creating a conducive environment to develop the capabilities of the digital youth and invest in their creative potential to maximize returns.
Al-Sawah noted that the event also aimed at "harnessing their abilities to develop the digital transformation process," calling for intensified and unified efforts in order to invest in Saudi talents for the benefit of the nation.
The minister was speaking during a meeting with Marian Taher Saleh, the youngest Saudi female journalist, alongside with her father.
Al-Sawah praised the role of her family, who have been supporting her from the beginning till she was able to enter the media field, expressing his appreciation for her media achievements.
For his part, Saleh's father expressed his gratitude and appreciation to the minister for his hospitality, appreciation and encouragement for his daughter.