Spotting a woman out in the street driving still a rarity in KSA

People are keeping count of how many women they have seen driving. AFP
Updated 09 July 2018
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Spotting a woman out in the street driving still a rarity in KSA

  • More than 120,000 women have applied or expressed interest in obtaining a license so far

RIYADH: Ever since June 24, when the ban on women driving was lifted, many Saudis have been trying their luck at spotting an actual woman behind the wheel.
People are keeping count of how many they’ve seen driving.
As the number is still low, it’s become something of a phenomenon to spot one on the busy streets of Riyadh.
“People are joking that women drivers are like the Pokémon game: Rare to spot and everyone is looking out for them,” said Mozon S, a mother of three, who has registered at the Saudi driving school at Princess Noura University. She started taking lessons this week.
“The number of ladies that have received their driving licenses do not compare to the amount of men who already have theirs. Therefore, the number of women taking to the streets is relatively low.”
“A lot of men are saying look, women don’t want to drive, we haven’t seen any so far,” Mozon said.
“But if they go to women driving schools and they see the ladies registering for a license, they will be surprised by the sheer number. Women by nature are responsible. This matter is no different to them. They know driving is a responsibility, which should be taken seriously and through legal means.”
“So far, I’ve only seen one lady drive at the Bahrain and Khobar intersection.” said Noor Musheiykh, an architect.
“I was shocked. It felt weird, and I laughed afterwards. It’s because this is new, and we haven’t seen it, yet. The number of licenses issued for ladies is small, but them driving is giving off positive vibes!”
More than 120,000 women have applied or expressed interest in obtaining a license so far. Which would explain the small number of women on the streets.


Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, said Saudi Arabia's foreign minister. (AFP)
Updated 16 November 2018
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Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

  • Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, says Saudi FM
  • Al-Jubeir: Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict

RIYADH: The Saudi-led coalition is working with UN envoy Martin Griffith to reach a political solution to the conflict in Yemen based on UN Security Council resolution 2216, the Gulf Initiative and the outcomes of Yemeni national dialogue, the Saudi foreign minister said on Thursday. 

“Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, and the solution should lead to the restoration of legitimacy in Yemen,” said Adel Al-Jubeir.

“We support a peaceful solution in Yemen. We support the efforts of the UN envoy for the Yemeni cause,” he added.

“We are committed to providing all humanitarian support to our brothers there. We are also working on the post-war reconstruction of Yemen.” The Kingdom supports the envoy’s efforts to hold negotiations at the end of November, added Al-Jubeir.

Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict, he said.

In contrast, Houthi militias are imposing restrictions on Yemeni cities and villages, leading to starvation, he added. 

They are also seizing humanitarian aid and preventing Yemenis from getting cholera vaccinations, Al-Jubeir said. 

The Houthis fire ballistic missiles indiscriminately at Saudi Arabia, use children as fighters and plant mines across Yemen, he added. 

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, he said.

Saudi Arabia did not want the conflict in Yemen; it was imposed on the Kingdom, Al-Jubeir added. 

Saudi Arabia worked with other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states to develop the Gulf Initiative. 

This led to a transition from former President Ali Abdullah Saleh to the internationally recognized government headed by current President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.

The Kingdom also worked to develop Yemeni national dialogue that led to a Yemeni vision regarding the country’s future.

A new Yemeni constitution was about to be drafted when the Houthis seized much of the country, including the capital. 

Yemen’s legitimate government requested support, and the Saudi-led coalition responded under Article 51 of the UN Charter.