Netflix taken to court in India over portrayal of former Rajiv Gandhi

The petition asks the court to order Netflix to delete derogatory remarks made directly or indirectly in the Netflix series Sacred Games against Rajiv Gandhi or his family. (AFP)
Updated 13 July 2018
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Netflix taken to court in India over portrayal of former Rajiv Gandhi

MUMBAI: An Indian politician has taken streaming giant Netflix to court, asking that it delete “offensive scenes” and derogatory remarks about former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi in its first Indian original series.
The Delhi High Court adjourned the case on Thursday to give judges and respondents time to study the petition filed by Nikhil Bhalla, a lawyer and a member of the opposition Congress party, which Gandhi led for seven years until his assassination in 1991.
The series, Sacred Games, is a thriller set in Mumbai with a cast of police officers, spies and politicians. It debuted this month in the first of a series of new shows aimed at the Indian market.
In one scene, Gandhi is referred to as a “fattu,” a Hindi slang word for a coward.
Grainy news footage shows him shaking hands with world leaders, while a voice-over accuses him of appeasing Muslim groups in a case involving divorce rights for Muslim women.
“The show ‘Sacred Games’ has inappropriate dialogues, political attacks and even speeches, which are derogatory in nature and harms the reputation of the former Prime Minister Shri Rajiv Gandhi,” the petition said.
A Netflix spokesman in India did not reply to phone calls and text messages seeking comment.
Gandhi became prime minister after his mother Indira was assassinated in 1984. He lost power five years later and in 1991, still holding the post of Congress party president, was killed by an ethnic Tamil suicide bomber.
His son, Rahul Gandhi, is the current party president.
The petition asks the court to order Netflix to delete derogatory remarks made directly or indirectly against Rajiv Gandhi or his family.
“We cannot afford to, in the name of freedom of speech allow anything to be beamed in every home without regard to its impact on society,” the petition said.
The series, based on a 2006 novel by Vikram Chandra, has won critical praise for its gritty portrayal of Mumbai’s crime scene and politics.
Both Netflix and its streaming rival Prime Video, owned by Amazon.com, are scrambling to add local content in a bid to woo Indian viewers at home and overseas.
But movies and television shows at times run afoul of Indian viewers and conservative groups.
Last month, American television studio ABC apologized to Indian fans of its show Quantico, after online outrage over a Hindu terror plot. Quantico star Priyanka Chopra also apologized, saying she would always be a “proud Indian.”
India does not censor content on the Internet, but movies and television are both heavily censored.


Twitter blocks accounts of Iranian state media outlets

Updated 21 July 2019
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Twitter blocks accounts of Iranian state media outlets

  • Twitter said the accounts harassed people linked to the Baha’i faith
  • The Baha’i faith is a religious minority that has long faced persecution in Iran

WASHINGTON: A day after Twitter suspended the accounts of several Iranian state media outlets, the social networking service said Saturday it acted after harassment of people linked to the Baha’i faith.
Amid soaring tensions in the region, heightened by Iran’s seizure on Friday of a British-flagged tanker, some of the affected media outlets had speculated that the suspensions were related to their coverage of the seizure.
But Twitter cited what it said was the coordinated and targeted harassment of people linked to the Baha’i faith, a religious minority that has long faced persecution in Iran.
It did not name the suspended accounts, and said it was continuing to investigate the matter.
“Account suspended. Twitter suspends accounts which violate the Twitter Rules,” read English-language messages on each of the Iranian media outlets’ accounts.
Mehr news agency, which is close to moderate conservatives in Iran, said its Farsi-language account appeared to have been blocked late Friday following its reports on the seizure of the tanker Stena Impero in the strategic Strait of Hormuz.
Iran’s Revolutionary Guard said it seized the Swedish-owned tanker for breaking “international maritime rules” in the strait, a chokepoint for around a third of the world’s sea-borne oil.
Mehr’s Farsi-language Twitter page was inaccessible on Saturday, along with those of the official IRNA news agency and the agency of the Young Journalists’ Club.
“Since last night and after seizure of a British tanker in the Strait of Hormuz the account of the Young Journalists’ Club and some other users have been suspended,” the YJC said on its website.
Mehr noted that its Mehr Diplomacy account, which publishes analysis and interviews on foreign policy, was also offline.
Another account taken down belonged to Ali Akbar Raefipoor, a hard-line public speaker.
None of the owners of the suspended accounts said they had been given any reason for the move by Twitter.
The micro-blogging platform is banned in Iran, but many officials still have accounts and people access them by using a virtual private network, or VPN, to bypass censorship.