Britain unveils “short and sharper” code for companies

The new code considers economic and social issues and will help to guide the long-term success of UK businesses. (AFP)
Updated 16 July 2018
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Britain unveils “short and sharper” code for companies

  • The new code emphasises the need for boards to refresh themselves, become diverse and plan properly for replacing top jobs
  • Company remuneration committees should also take into account workforce pay when setting director pay

LONDON: Companies in Britain must strive to rein in excessive executive pay and make boards more diverse under a new “short and sharper” corporate code, published on Monday.
The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) has updated its code of corporate standards for publicly listed companies, which must comply with it or explain to shareholders if they do not.
The new code comes as the watchdog, which oversees company governance standards and accountants, faces a review to see if it can uphold high corporate standards to maintain Britain’s attractions as a place to invest after Brexit.
British lawmakers have called for tougher corporate govenance standards following a row between food retailer Tesco and its suppliers and the collapse of retailer BHS and outsourcer Carillion. And shareholders have become much more active in terms of rejecting some executive pay deals.
“To make sure the UK moves with the times, the new code considers economic and social issues and will help to guide the long-term success of UK businesses,” FRC Chairman Win Bischoff said.
“This new code, in its short and sharper form, and with its overarching theme of trust, is paramount in promoting transparency and integrity in business for society as a whole.”
There is a new provision for greater board engagement with the workforce to understand their views — aimed at reinforcing an existing provision in law since 2006 which has had a patchy impact.
This, along with a requiremnent to have “whistleblowing” mechanisms that allow directors and staff to raise concerns for effective investigation, mark the biggest broadening of corporate standards in many years, the FRC said.
“The new code is much stronger on abilities to raise concerns in confidence,” said David Styles, FRC director of corporate governance.
It also emphasises the need for boards to refresh themselves, become diverse and plan properly for replacing top jobs.
It introduces a requirement for companies to explain publicly if a board chair has remain unchanged for more than nine years.
Company remuneration committees should also take into account workforce pay when setting director pay.
“To address public concern over executive remuneration... formulaic calculations of performance-related pay should be rejected,” the watchdog said.


Iran anti-money laundering law faces challenge as deadline looms

Updated 18 August 2018
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Iran anti-money laundering law faces challenge as deadline looms

  • Iran has been trying to implement standards set by the Financial Action Task Force
  • Foreign businesses say legislation that includes FATF guidelines is essential if they are to increase investment

DUBAI: A top Iranian constitutional body has demanded changes to anti-money laundering measures passed by parliament, state-run media said on Saturday, as Tehran nears a deadline to pass legislation to help it attract investment while facing USsanctions.
Iran has been trying to implement standards set by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), an inter-governmental organization which underpins regimes combatting money laundering and terrorist financing. It hopes it will be removed from a blacklist that makes some foreign investors reluctant to deal with it.
In June, FATF said Iran had until October to complete the reforms or face consequences that could further deter investors from the country, which has already been hit by the return of US sanctions. {nL5N1UY39D]
Hard-liners in parliament have opposed legislation aimed at moving toward compliance with FATF standards, arguing it could hamper Iranian financial support for allies such as Lebanon’s Hezbollah, which the United States has classified as a terrorist organization.
The Guardian Council, which vets legislation passed by parliament for compliance with the constitution, objected to four items in the anti-money laundering amendments and returned the measure to parliament, spokesman Abbas Ali Kadkhodaei was quoted by the judiciary’s news agency Mizan as saying.
Kadkhodaei did not give details of the four items, according to Mizan.
Earlier this month, the Guardian Council approved legal amendments on combating the funding of terrorism.
Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said in June parliament should pass legislation to combat money laundering according to its own criteria.
Foreign businesses say legislation that includes FATF guidelines is essential if they are to increase investment.