ArcelorMittal Temirtau to suspend hot-rolled steel coil exports to Iran: adviser

The suspension follows President Trump's decision to abandon the Iran nuclear deal. (Shutterstock)
Updated 17 July 2018
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ArcelorMittal Temirtau to suspend hot-rolled steel coil exports to Iran: adviser

  • The decision follows President Trump’s announcement that the US would withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal
  • Trump has previously suggested that organizations that continue to trade with Iran could potentially face sanctions

MOSCOW: ArcelorMittal Temirtau, a Kazakh unit of the world's largest steelmaker, will suspend the export of hot-rolled steel coils to Iran due to the re-imposition of US sanctions, Alex Agoureev, an adviser to the company, told Reuters.
"Supplies to Iran will be temporarily suspended due to the sanctions. Once sanctions are lifted, the supplies will be resumed," said Agoureev, an adviser to ArcelorMittal CIS CEO Paramjit Kahlon.
He did not say when the suspension would happen or provide further details.
In May, President Donald Trump withdrew the United States from the Iran nuclear deal and ordered the reimposition of US sanctions against Tehran that were suspended under the 2015 accord. A range of U.S. sanctions is due to kick in after a "wind-down" period ends on Aug. 6.


China’s car sales decline deepens, road ahead bumpy

Updated 53 min 27 sec ago
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China’s car sales decline deepens, road ahead bumpy

  • ‘Car sales in January continued to decline, and there was no sign of improvement’
  • China has been grappling with slowing economic growth as well as the fallout of trade frictions with the US

SHANGHAI: China’s automobile sales in January tumbled 15.8 percent from a year earlier, the country’s top auto industry association said on Monday, as the world’s largest auto market hits the skids with the slump in sales extending to the seventh month.
China’s Association of Automobile Manufacturers (CAAM) said in an emailed statement to Reuters that sales dropped to 2.37 million vehicles last month. This follows a 13 percent drop in December and a 14 percent fall in November.
“Car sales in January continued to decline, and there was no sign of improvement. We estimate that February wholesales will also drop sharply” said Xu Haidong, CAAM assistant secretary general.
“The reason for the sales drop is still the slowing overall economy, and consumption decline in small and medium-sized cities” Xu said.
China has been grappling with slowing economic growth as well as the fallout of trade frictions with the United States, forces which contributed to its auto market contracting for the first time in more than two decades last year.
Beijing is now trying to persuade consumers to loosen their purse strings and has pledged to provide subsidies to boost rural sales of some vehicles and purchases of new energy vehicles.
“Q1 sales were good last year, so this year the industry expects to have negative growth in the first quarter” Yale Zhang, head of consultancy AutoForesight, said, but he predicts sales to gradually pick up in the next three quarters.
Industry executives also say China’s car sales in January and February tend to be affected by the Lunar New Year holiday, as consumers hold off on their car purchasing decisions around the festival.
The holiday’s dates change annually but tend to occur in either month. It took place in the first week of February this year.
China’s sales of new energy vehicles, however, continued to buck the trend, totaling 95,700 in January, a year-on-year increase of 140 percent, CAAM said.