Oman’s Religious Affairs Ministry says second wife rule claim was ‘fake news’

oman
Updated 18 July 2018
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Oman’s Religious Affairs Ministry says second wife rule claim was ‘fake news’

DUBAI: Oman’s Religious Affairs Ministry said reports of a decision allegedly forcing local men to wed multiple wives to boost the population were “fake news,” local daily Times of Oman reported.
False claims spread on social media in a post that read, “Due to the lack of population growth, the Ministry of Endowments and Religious Affairs decided [that] every man must marry at least two women and the state will support them monetarily,” the report added.
“A woman who tries to prevent her husband [from getting married again will face] a penalty set by the ‘Department of Women Preaching and Guidance’ in the Ministry,” it added.
But the Religious Affairs Ministry dispelled the rumors, and issued a statement which stated: “Referring to the rumor that is being circulated, the Ministry would like to point out that this decision has not been issued by the Ministry of Endowments and Religious Affairs and that they will take legal action against [the person who started] rumor.”


Indonesia woman irked by mosque noise convicted of blasphemy

Updated 21 August 2018
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Indonesia woman irked by mosque noise convicted of blasphemy

  • Prosecutors said the 44-year-old defendant violated the criminal code by committing blasphemy against Islam
  • The maximum sentence for blasphemy is two years

MEDAN, Indonesia: An Indonesian court has sentenced a woman who complained about a noisy mosque to 18 months in prison for blasphemy.
The ethnic Chinese woman, Meiliana, burst into tears as presiding Judge Wahyu Prasetyo Wibowo announced the sentence Tuesday. She was taken from the court in handcuffs.
Prosecutors said the 44-year-old defendant violated the criminal code by committing blasphemy against Islam, the dominant faith in Indonesia, the world’s most populous Muslim nation.
Mobs burned and ransacked at least 14 Buddhist temples throughout Tanjung Balai, a port town on Sumatra, in a July 2016 riot following reports of Meiliana’s complaint about a mosque’s noisy loudspeakers.
The woman’s lawyer, Ranto Sibarani, said the sentence would be appealed. A conservative group, Islamic Community Forum, said Meilana’s sentence was too light.
The maximum sentence for blasphemy is two years.
Indonesia’s Constitution guarantees freedom of speech and religion but in recent years blasphemy cases have been filed against those perceived as offending Islam. The overwhelming majority end with guilty verdicts.
Last year, the minority Christian and ethnic Chinese governor of Jakarta, the capital, was convicted of blasphemy and imprisoned for two years after massive street protests over comments seized upon by his political opponents.
Judges imposed the sentence despite prosecutors downgrading the blasphemy charge to a lesser offense.