Lufthansa to start flights to Israeli Red Sea resort Eilat

Eilat, Israel’s southernmost city, borders Jordan and Egypt. (Shutterstock)
Updated 18 July 2018
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Lufthansa to start flights to Israeli Red Sea resort Eilat

  • More than 175,000 foreign tourists flew into Ovda in the first five months of 2018
  • Lufthansa said it would fly to Ovda from Frankfurt and Munich twice weekly starting Oct. 28

JERUSALEM: Lufthansa said on Wednesday it will launch four weekly flights to Eilat, the Red Sea resort which Israel hopes to turn into a winter vacation spot for foreign tourists.
More than 175,000 foreign tourists flew into Ovda, a converted military airfield 60 km (40 miles) from Eilat, in the first five months of 2018, double the amount for all of 2017.
Helping spur growth is a government grant of 60 euros ($70) per passenger for airlines starting routes to Eilat.
Lufthansa said it would fly to Ovda from Frankfurt and Munich twice weekly starting Oct. 28.
Eilat, Israel’s southernmost city, borders Jordan and Egypt. It will later be served by the new Ramon International Airport which is expected to open in early 2019.
Since 2015, a number of airlines, mainly low-cost, have been operating direct flights to Ovda, led by Ryanair and WizzAir.
“The number of flights to the city has increased from four weekly flights to more than 60 weekly flights,” said Tourism Minister Yariv Levin.
The Tourism Ministry has a budget of 30 million shekels ($8.25 million) a year for subsidising flights to Ovda.
“We are willing to pay more,” Levin said, adding the ministry is also in talks with British Airways. The airline declined to comment.
International tourist arrivals in Israel hit a record 3.6 million last year, pumping $5.5 billion into the economy.


Gulf defense spending ‘to top $110bn by 2023’

Updated 52 min 16 sec ago
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Gulf defense spending ‘to top $110bn by 2023’

  • Saudi Arabia and UAE initiatives ‘driving forward industrial defense capabilities’
  • Budgets are increasing as countries pursue modernization of equipment and expansion of their current capabilities

LONDON: Defense spending by Gulf Arab states is expected to rise to more than $110 billion by 2023, driven partly by localized military initiatives by Saudi Arabia and the UAE, a report has found.

Budgets are increasing as countries pursue the modernization of equipment and expansion of their current capabilities, according to a report by analytics firm Jane’s by IHS Markit.

Military expenditure in the Gulf will increase from $82.33 billion in 2013 to an estimated $103.01 billion in 2019, and is forecast to continue trending upward to $110.86 billion in 2023.

“Falling energy revenues between 2014 and 2016 led to some major procurement projects being delayed as governments reigned in budget deficits,” said Charles Forrester, senior defense industry analyst at Jane’s.

“However, defense was generally protected from the worst of the spending cuts due to regional security concerns and budgets are now growing again.”

Major deals in the region have included Eurofighter Typhoon purchases by countries including Saudi Arabia and Kuwait.

Saudi Arabia is also looking to “localize” 50 percent of total government military spending in the Kingdom by 2030, and in 2017 announced the launch of the state-owned military industrial company Saudi Arabia Military Industries.

Forrester said such moves will boost the ability for Gulf countries to start exporting, rather than purely importing defense equipment.

“Within the defense sector, the establishment of Saudi Arabia Military Industries (SAMI) in 2017 and consolidation of the UAE’s defense industrial base through the creation of Emirates Defense Industries Company (EDIC) in 2014 have helped consolidate and drive forward industrial defense capabilities,” he said.

“This has happened as the countries focus on improving the quality of the defense technological work packages they undertake through offset, as well as increasing their ability to begin exporting defense equipment.”

Regional countries are also considering the use of “disruptive technologies” such as artificial intelligence in defense, Forrester said.

Meanwhile, it emerged on Friday that worldwide outlays on weapons and defense rose 1.8 percent to more than $1.67 trillion in 2018.

The US was responsible for almost half that increase, according to “The Military Balance” report released at the Munich Security Conference and quoted by Reuters.

Western powers were concerned about Russia’s upgrades of air bases and air defense systems in Crimea, the report said, but added that “China perhaps represents even more of a challenge, as it introduces yet more advanced military systems and is engaged in a strategy to improve its forces’ ability to operate at distance from the homeland.”