Bruce Springsteen surprises audience at Billy Joel concert

Musician Billy Joel performs during his 100th lifetime performance at Madison Square Garden on Wednesday on July 18. (Invision/AP)
Updated 19 July 2018
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Bruce Springsteen surprises audience at Billy Joel concert

NEW YORK: Bruce Springsteen propped himself on top of Billy Joel’s piano to sing a duet with The Piano Man, who was celebrating his 100th concert at Madison Square Garden on Wednesday night.
Joel told the energetic crowd he had a guest coming onstage who has won a Grammy, Oscar and Tony. Springsteen emerged, surprising the feverish and fanatic audience, who loudly cheered “BRUCE.”
“Congratulations Billy on your 100th show,” Springsteen yelled.
“Ready, Billy?” he asked, as Joel began to play while sitting at the piano.
Springsteen encouraged the crowd to cheer louder and then sang “Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out.” He jumped onto Joel’s piano — making it on his second try — and sat on it while Joel played and the piano slowly spun. Springsteen then rocked his guitar for “Born to Run.”
Joel, 69, and Springsteen, 68, hugged after their two-song performance, and The Boss kissed Joel on his head as he walked offstage.
A banner celebrating Joel’s 100th performance at MSG rose to the ceiling near the top of the two-hour-plus concert. Joel started performing a monthly residency at the arena in 2014. No artist has performed at the famed venue more than Joel.
“Good evening to you New York City,” said Joel, whose two-year-old daughter, Della Rose Joel, sat on his lap. “I want to thank you all for coming to our show.”
Joel was excited throughout his set, going from piano to harmonica to guitar. He put on his sunglasses while he passionately sang “New York State of Mind” and twirled his microphone stand in the air and danced happily after singing “Uptown Girl.”
He said he had to think of a special song to sing to celebrate his new milestone, and then performed “This Is the Time.”
“Maybe it’ll hit me later,” he said of his new feat.
Earlier on Wednesday Governor Andrew Cuomo proclaimed July 18, 2018 as “Billy Joel Day.” Joel, who was born in the Bronx, first performed at MSG on December 14, 1978. His piano is on display in front of the venue.


‘Gold’ whips up India’s patriotism through hockey

Updated 21 August 2018
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‘Gold’ whips up India’s patriotism through hockey

CHENNAI: Sports films seem to be the fashion in India. In recent times, there has been “Soorma,” “Chak De! India,” “Mary Kom,” “Sala Khadoos” and “Lagaan.” And now it is Reema Kagti’s “Gold,” a fictional story loosely based on India’s first gold medal as an independent country at the 1948 London Olympics.
Bollywood bigwig Akshay Kumar, who has in recent years taken on the role of a patriotic Samaritan with movies like “Padman,” “Toilet,” “Airlift” and so on, portrays Tapan Das, a Bengali coach and manager of India’s field hockey team.
Dhoti-clad Das is passionate about the country’s national game, which has now been eclipsed by the glamorous and money-spinning cricket. A bit of a clown and an alcoholic, he somehow manages to convince the hockey federation that he can assemble a winning team and clinch the gold at the London Olympics, just a year after India became a free country. Putting together a team of players (Kunal Kapoor, Amit Sadh, Vineet Kumar Singh and Sunny Kaushal among others ), Das raises a battle cry: Let us avenge 200 years of British slavery by winning the hockey gold on their home turf!
The script and the way it has been narrated capture the essence of a newly independent India, struggling to cope with the blood and gore of the Partition, and it is a heart-rending human tragedy. What is more, “Gold” is a brutal reminder of how the division of the Indian subcontinent into two nations not only split the people, but also its sports and players. There is a poignant moment when we see Pakistani players cheering Indians on the field in what was to be one of the last examples of such unity.
Admittedly, Akshay carries the film with his antics, bordering on buffoonery, and an almost obsessive earnestness. But he appears to be playing this nation-building patriotic card a little too often, pushing us into a bit of boredom. “Gold” is not in the same league as “Chak De! India” or “Lagaan.” A certain novelty we saw in these two movies seems to have been lost.