Archaeologists find ancient pottery workshop in Egypt

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This handout picture released on July 19, 2018, by the Egyptian Antiquities ministry shows the oldest workshop for the pottery industry of the old state discovered by a mission working in the groundwater reduction project in the Temple of Kom Ombo in Aswan. (AFP/EGYPTIAN ANTIQUITIES MINISTRY)
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This handout picture released on July 19, 2018, by the Egyptian Antiquities ministry shows the oldest workshop for the pottery industry of the old state discovered by a mission working in the groundwater reduction project in the Temple of Kom Ombo in Aswan. (AFP/EGYPTIAN ANTIQUITIES MINISTRY)
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This handout picture released on July 19, 2018, by the Egyptian Antiquities ministry shows the oldest workshop for the pottery industry of the old state discovered by a mission working in the groundwater reduction project in the Temple of Kom Ombo in Aswan. (AFP/EGYPTIAN ANTIQUITIES MINISTRY)
Updated 19 July 2018
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Archaeologists find ancient pottery workshop in Egypt

  • The workshop, the oldest pottery workshop in the Old Kingdom, belongs to the 4th Dynasty
  • Inside the workshop, archaeologists found an ancient pottery manufacturing wheel made of a limestone turntable and a hollow base

CAIRO: Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered an ancient pottery manufacturing workshop dating to more than 4,000 years ago in the southern province of Aswan, the Antiquities Ministry said Thursday.
The workshop, the oldest pottery workshop in the Old Kingdom, belongs to the 4th Dynasty, spanning 2,613 to 2,494 B.C., the ministry said in a statement. The Old Kingdom is also known as the age when pyramid-building flourished.
Inside the workshop, archaeologists found an ancient pottery manufacturing wheel made of a limestone turntable and a hollow base.
Mostafa Al-Waziri, secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, says the discovery is “rare” and reveals more about the development of pottery manufacturing and the daily lives of ancient Egyptians during that time in history.
Also on Thursday, archaeologists opened a large, sealed, black granite sarcophagus dating to some 2,000 years ago in the coastal city of Alexandria. The discovery, announced earlier this month, triggered speculation in local and international media about its contents.
However, Al-Waziri told reporters that only skeletal remains and sewage water were found in the sarcophagus, quashing speculation that it belonged to some ancient ruler. He said the sarcophagus, weighting some 30 tons, may have belonged to a wealthy family that lived during the Ptolemaic era.
Later, the Antiquities Ministry said in a statement that initial inspection suggests the the skeletal remains likely belonged to three warriors. It said the remains will undergo restoration to reveal more about them.
Egypt has gone to great length to revive its vital tourism industry, still reeling from the political turmoil that followed a 2011 popular uprising. In recent years, the Antiquities Ministry has touted discoveries in the hopes of bolstering tourism, a major pillar of foreign currency.


Sony Music ends contract with US singer R. Kelly

Updated 19 January 2019
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Sony Music ends contract with US singer R. Kelly

  • The singer of ‘I Believe I Can Fly’ fame — who recently announced a new album — has seen his reputation more and more seriously hard hit
  • Spotify announced in May it would drop the singer from its curated ‘playlists’

NEW YORK: Sony Music has called it quits with embattled singer R. Kelly, ending his contract with subsidiary RCA after a documentary aired accusing him of repeated cases of sexual abuse, media reports said Friday.
While Variety and Billboard reported the breakup, Sony Music did not immediately confirm it when contacted by AFP.
One woman who sued R. Kelly, accusing him of sexual battery, knowingly infecting her with a sexually transmitted disease and false imprisonment, also says he has threatened her.
Women’s rights attorney Gloria Allred told reporters on Monday that her client Faith Rodgers, 20, faced “efforts to intimidate and retaliate” from Kelly after she filed the lawsuit now pending in New York’s Supreme Court.
And just after Rodgers testified in the documentary “Surviving R. Kelly” that aired this month, her lawyers say Kelly and his team created a Facebook page — which the social media giant removed within hours — seeking to discredit accusers including Rodgers, posting “private” photos of her.
But the singer of “I Believe I Can Fly” fame — who recently announced a new album — has seen his reputation more and more seriously hard hit.
Calls for a boycott gathered pace in some measure thanks to the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements and via the #MuteRKelly hashtag on Twitter.
Spotify announced in May it would drop the singer from its curated “playlists.”
The last straw was the broadcast in early January of “Surviving R. Kelly,” a documentary in which several women accused the singer and producer, 52, of having sex with girls under the age of 16, and of having surrounded themselves with women whom he made sex slaves.