Why Juventus could prove to be Cristiano Ronaldo’s toughest, most rewarding challenge yet

Cristiano Ronaldo gestures as he arrives at the Juventus' medical center in Turin, Italy July 16, 2018. (REUTERS/Massimo Pinca)
Updated 20 July 2018
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Why Juventus could prove to be Cristiano Ronaldo’s toughest, most rewarding challenge yet

  • Portuguese superstar has moved to Italian giants in deal worth nearly $120 million
  • Ronaldo scored 450 goals in 438 games for Real Madrid

LONDON: Love him or loathe him, you have to admire Cristiano Ronaldo’s character.
At a time of life when lesser mortals are lured by big paychecks to the likes of Qatar or China, the mercurial Madeiran has opted for what will be his biggest challenge yet at Juventus.
His career over the last decade has been played out under the cloud of the never-ending debate — “Ronaldo or Messi; who is better?”
Thankfully, that circus was quietened somewhat at the recent World Cup. Some flashes of pure brilliance aside, neither player made a big enough impact to lead their respective teams to glory and Messi’s wait for an international trophy goes on.
And, while both players are undeniably in a league of their own, the fact Ronaldo does have a European Championship title under his belt will always tip the argument toward the Portuguese — especially for those who measure greatness in statistics and trophies.
In fairness, Ronaldo’s statistics are mind-boggling. His stint at Manchester United, where he cut his teeth and started to show his potential as a great of the game, was instrumental in the club winning three Premier League titles and their third European crown. His staggering 450 goals in 438 games for Real Madrid saw him become the Spanish giant’s record goalscorer on his way to winning everything under the sun.
But the Premier League and La Liga are leagues in which attacking footballers flourish. With the dawning of wall-to-wall TV coverage, they have both been transformed to entertain the billions of people who tune in every week — and in this day and age, goalscoring superstars win you fans, not defenses.
The art of defending has all-but disappeared and the culture of building a spine through a team has slowly but surely been eroded away. Nobody wants to watch an engrossing, absorbing, end-to-end goalless draw anymore — it is all about 6-5 thrillers.
But not so in Italy.
Serie A, for all its scandals and fall from grace since its heady days of the 1990s, is still an extremely difficult league to win. It is a league in which fans and managers place great emphasis on defending, on building teams from back-to-front (not the other way around) and on the mentality of “you cannot lose if you don’t concede.”
Granted, Juventus have walked Serie A for the past seven seasons; it is to be expected from one of the richest clubs in the world. But rarely have they won it at a canter. Never once have they scored anywhere near 100 goals in a season to win it — unlike Manchester City in last season’s Premier League, or Barcelona and Real Madrid almost every season in the same period.
And not once has Serie A’s top-goalscorer reached the dizzying heights Ronaldo (and Messi) hit in La Liga season after season, nor has it always been a Juventus player claiming the golden boot.
This all points to a monumental challenge for Ronaldo. On paper, he should not find it as easy to score goals in Serie A and with the marked improvement of Napoli, Roma and Lazio recently, nor will it be an easy ride for Juventus to claim an eighth scudetto in a row this year.
So, while Messi prefers to stay in one country and within his comfort zone of the defense-shy Spanish league, if a 30-something Ronaldo succeeds in Italy — or, better yet, guides Juventus to the European glory the fans crave so much — it would be his most remarkable achievement yet.
And it would put the tiresome debate over who is the greatest ever to bed, once and for all.
No contest.


Virat Kohli century leaves England facing big task to win 3rd test

Updated 21 August 2018
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Virat Kohli century leaves England facing big task to win 3rd test

NOTTINGHAM: India captain Virat Kohli kept up his brilliant summer form by hitting 103 before setting England a world-record target of 521 to win the third Test and clinch the series with two matches to spare.
Nine overs into its run chase, England reached 23-0 at stumps and still needed 498 runs to complete what would be a highly improbable victory at Trent Bridge.
The highest successful run chase in test history is 418, by West Indies against Australia in 2003.
England lead the five-match series 2-0.
Kohli has scored twice as many runs as any other player this series, with his 23rd test century adding to the 97 from the first innings to take his series average to 73.33. He made 149 in the first test at Edgbaston, and is in line to return to the top of the test batting rankings above Australia’s Steve Smith.
A day after taking 5-28, Hardik Pandya smashed an unbeaten 52 off 52 balls before India declared on 352-7 late on day three. Cheteshwar Pujara, resuming overnight alongside Kohli with India on 124-2, earlier made 72 after being dropped on 40 by Alastair Cook in the slips.
Cook (9) and Keaton Jennings (13) survived a testing spell before the close to take the target below 500. The pitch still looks good for batting, but India remains the heavy favorite.
“The pitch has quickened up a bit,” Pujara said. “It is a lot quicker and there is a lot of deviation. On day four, it won’t be easy for them to bat.”
England’s faint chances of avoiding defeat in Nottingham were hit during the first session of the day when wicketkeeper-batsman Jonny Bairstow broke a bone in the middle finger of his left hand attempting to take a catch.
Bairstow didn’t return to the field — Jos Buttler took over wicketkeeping duties — and England didn’t give an indication of whether Bairstow will be asked to bat in the team’s second innings.
“Although we are a long way behind,” England assistant coach Paul Farbrace said, “we showed real effort and it was important not to lose any wickets this evening.”