What We Are Reading Today: Design Magazine: Spirituality, by Raghad Alahmad

Updated 19 July 2018
0

What We Are Reading Today: Design Magazine: Spirituality, by Raghad Alahmad

I obtained a copy of Design Magazine by chance while covering an art event in Jeddah. I was mesmerized by the cover, designed by artist Raghad Alahmad: A recreational tree, people who look like they have come out of a book on the Islamic era, and a very catchy yellow background.

Issue 55 covers numerous topics, beginning with an interview with an interior designer and her passion for Islamic art, “not only for its beauty, but for the many stories each artifact and monument carries.” 

This is followed by a piece on the night lights of Islam’s capital Makkah, and how time plays a part in its significance.

The brains behind the magazine, Kholoud Attar, has worked with artists and designers to shed light on the scene in Saudi Arabia, and to discover unknown talents.


What We Are Reading Today: The Art of Philosophy by Susanna Berger

Updated 20 February 2019
0

What We Are Reading Today: The Art of Philosophy by Susanna Berger

  • The Art of Philosophy shows that the making and study of visual art functioned as important methods of philosophical thinking and instruction

Delving into the intersections between artistic images and philosophical knowledge in Europe from the late 16th to the early 18th centuries, The Art of Philosophy shows that the making and study of visual art functioned as important methods of philosophical thinking and instruction. From frontispieces of books to monumental prints created by philosophers in collaboration with renowned artists, Susanna Berger examines visual representations of philosophy and overturns prevailing assumptions about the limited function of the visual in European intellectual history.

Rather than merely illustrating already-existing philosophical concepts, visual images generated new knowledge for both Aristotelian thinkers and anti-Aristotelians, such as Descartes and Hobbes. Printmaking and drawing played a decisive role in discoveries that led to a move away from the authority of Aristotle in the 17th century. Berger interprets visual art from printed books, student lecture notebooks, alba amicorum (friendship albums), broadsides, and paintings, and examines the work of such artists as Pietro Testa, Léonard Gaultier, Abraham Bosse, Dürer, and Rembrandt.

In particular, she focuses on the rise and decline of the “plural image,” a genre that was popular among early modern philosophers. Plural images brought multiple images together on the same page, often in order to visualize systems of logic, metaphysics, natural philosophy, or moral philosophy.