Saudi fashion label puts women in limelight

Renad Hefni showcases her brand Royaled collection. Her bold spring/summer collection aims to make women feel powerful and confident.( Photo/Supplied)
Updated 19 July 2018
0

Saudi fashion label puts women in limelight

  • In 2018, Saudi Arabia hosted its first Fashion Week in Riyadh and also made history by lifting its driving ban on women.
  • Renad Hefni won the Women Appreciation Month fashion award created by Femi9fashion brand in Jeddah

JEDDAH: Fashion and couture are on the rise in Saudi Arabia with the increase in young Saudi fashion icons and the growth of the creative community.

In 2018, the Kingdom hosted its first Fashion Week in Riyadh and also made history by lifting its driving ban on women.

With the growth of female empowerment in Kingdom, Renad Hefni, a fashion designer and graduate of Dar Al-Hekma University, began her brand Royaled to empower young women in the country. 

Hefni believes that “changing someone’s appearance can lead to changing people’s attitude toward one another.” Her brand celebrates female power.

“Royaled looks to celebrate every woman who treasures her character by crowning her with a virtual crown and a throne fit for the queen aura that radiates with inspiration. Jeweled with grace, charm and confidence,” she said.

Hefni told Arab News that to her the crown represents power, victory and glory. “It symbolizes leadership to closely align the women of the 21st century with their rights of passage to confidence and influence.”

She believes Royaled will stand out to young Saudi women as it represents their need to thrive and conquer.

“When everyone started to see the brand, they understood the message completely — from the logo to the slogan to all the crowns placed on every garment. Being recognized, understood and appreciated for why I became a designer is my proudest achievement,” Hefni said.

She promotes women’s rights through her fashion label. One of her collections, titled “Enthrone,” consists of half garments to let women feel that “they are the missing beautiful piece in every garment.”

Hefni won the Women Appreciation Month fashion award created by Femi9fashion brand in Jeddah.

Royaled has already made a name for itself with two fashion shows in Dubai and more to come. Royaled has a broad vision for the future.

“Our vision is to reach a wider audience in different countries and to dress some of the most powerful and well-known women. Royaled looks to expand its target market and reach international fashion weeks.” The brand has launched its spring/summer collection “The Ruler.” 

Inspired by the 1980s hiphop style mixed with Middle Eastern glam, the collection reminds women “of their power and confidence, creating a movement, an army of strong and capable women,” reads a post shared on the brand’s Instagram page.

UAE-Yemeni singer Balqees Fathi appeared in a video clip wearing Royaled’s tower collar vest.

Royaled was established in 2015 — it is a new name that has made big steps. See the brand’s page on Instagram: @RoyaledbyRH.


Miss England contestant wears a wetsuit to ‘stay true to Muslim background’

The 21-year-old posted the images of herself on Facebook wearing the wetsuit. (Shutterstock)
Updated 17 July 2019
0

Miss England contestant wears a wetsuit to ‘stay true to Muslim background’

DUBAI: Miss England contestant Aysha Khan took to social media recently to explain why she chose to wear a wetsuit in the optional swimsuit portion of the competition.

Khan, 21, from Lancashire posted the images of herself on Facebook wearing the wetsuit.

“I decided to enter the round this year, however I wanted to push forward the message that swimwear doesn’t necessarily mean a bikini,” the Education Studies student wrote. “Empowerment can be felt in many different ways and can be promoted in many different ways. Some women may feel more confident showing more skin and some women feel more confident showing less – the message being; empowerment is a personal feeling, and not wearing a bikini does not mean I am not confident about my body,” she captioned the post.

The contestant decided to take part in the optional round on her own terms, telling the Lancashire Telegraph, “This round is completely optional, and I didn’t want to miss out, so I submitted a photo in a surf suit. I wanted to show a different take on swimwear, and that you don’t have to wear a bikini to go to the beach.

 “I think other girls can see this and realize that they can do the same. Particularly because of my background, being Muslim too, I wanted to stay true to myself,” she added.

The pageant’s winner will be crowned on August 1.