Morocco’s litter-strewn beaches kick up a stink

A child plays at the beach of Rabat on July 12, 2018 Every summer, the Moroccan press publishes reports revolted on the state of different beaches of the Atlantic and the Mediterranean.(AFP)
Updated 20 July 2018
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Morocco’s litter-strewn beaches kick up a stink

  • Every summer, Morocco’s media publish reports lambasting the condition of sands stretching from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic
  • A nationwide ban on platic bags imposed in 2016 appears to have done little to stem the tide of rubbish piling up on beaches

RABAT: Blessed with a coastline that stretches for hundreds of kilometers across flat sandy expanses and rugged coves, Morocco’s beaches should be a magnet — but a litter crisis risks repelling sun seekers, citizens say.
On a small beach in the capital Rabat the words “Keep your city clean” are daubed across largely empty bins, seemingly mocked by the detritus on the ground.
The litter “spoils the pleasure,” says 22-year-old Said, who has come to Oudayas beach for a dip with friends to cool off on a hot day.
“Unfortunately, people don’t realize the importance of keeping beaches clean,” he laments, surrounded by cigarette butts and other trash, just a few steps from the edge of the old city.
Some feel they are fighting a losing battle.
“Rubbish collectors clean the beach from top to bottom every morning, but in the evening, bathers leave it even dirtier,” says a local official.
“Perhaps megaphones should be used to sensitise the people and embarrass the polluters,” the official adds.
The state of this small beach in the capital is far from unique.
Every summer, Morocco’s media publish reports lambasting the condition of sands stretching from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic.
A nationwide ban on platic bags imposed in 2016 appears to have done little to stem the tide of rubbish piling up on beaches, despite authorities strictly enforcing the measure.
The problem is in part generated outside Morocco — Greenpeace estimates that the equivalent of a truckload of plastic enters the world’s seas every 60 seconds.
And the activist group said in June it had found microplastics in samples collected in Antarctic waters.
But volunteers who take part in beach clean-ups say far too many Moroccans dump refuse without a second thought.
“In recent years we’ve seen water pollution increase due to a lack of awareness,” says 45-year-old Mohammed el Machkour, president of the Al Marjane sporting association.
Only 21 out of 40 beaches nominated nationwide for the coveted international “Blue Flag” status have met criteria, due to litter, poor water quality and other issues.
In Morocco’s commercial capital, netizens post indignantly on a “Save Casablanca” Facebook page.
“The people are disgusting,” one post says; “there is no environmental policing,” laments another, while a third demands the council provide more bins.
And it is not only beaches that are affected.
Returning from a recent lakeside walk near Rabat, Britain’s ambassador to Morocco Thomas Reilly tweeted his horror.
“The place has been ruined by plastic waste, sandwich remains, bottles and filth... it was disgusting. Morocco deserves better,” he said.
In a bid to shore up tourism, Morocco has launched several initiatives over the last couple of decades to improve the beaches.
An environmental body established in the king’s name spearheads annual beach clean-ups and funds television advertising campaigns.
The Mohammed VI Foundation has also worked to improve water quality — with some apparent success.
An analysis of 165 beaches at the start of the summer season showed 97 percent of waters “conform with microbiological standards,” compared to 72 percent in 2002, according to the secretary of state for the environment.
But back in Rabat, people still complain.
The hygiene “situation isn’t much better under the water,” says 25-year-old Hassan, near the beach.
In early July, a local association asked divers to volunteer to clean Sale marina, opposite Oudayas beach.
After two hours in the water, the divers recovered a litany of items, from iron bars to plastic bottles.
“We have taken part in cleaning a patch of the waters — hopefully people will understand the importance of keeping the beach clean,” says 22-year-old diver Alaeddine.
The divers are determined to bring about a culture change, even as they swim against the tide.
“We don’t claim to be able to clean all the sea and river, but we want to send a message on the importance of protecting the environment, above all to young people,” says another volunteer.


Iran faces angry online backlash over activists’ abuse claims

Since protests began in December, Iranians have had their internet access disrupted and have lost access to the messaging app Telegram. (Reuters)
Updated 18 February 2019
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Iran faces angry online backlash over activists’ abuse claims

  • The Arab minority in southwest Iran has long claimed that it faces discrimination from the central government

GENEVA, LONDON: In early January, labor activist Esmail Bakhshi posted a letter on Instagram saying he had been tortured in jail, attracting support from tens of thousands of Iranians online.
Bakhshi, who said he was still in pain, also challenged the intelligence minister to a public debate about the religious justification for torture. Late last month, Bakhshi was rearrested.
Sepideh Qoliyan, a journalist covering labor issues in the Ahvaz region, was also rearrested on the same day after saying on social media that she had been abused in jail.
Bakhshi’s allegations of torture and the social media furor that followed led Iranian President Hassan Rouhani to call for an investigation, and the intelligence minister subsequently met with a parliamentary committee to discuss the case, a rare example of top officials being prompted to act by a public backlash online.
“Each sentence and description of torture from the mouths of #Sepideh_Qoliyan and #Esmail_Bakhshi should be remembered and not forgotten because they are now alone with the torturers and under pressure and defenseless. Let us not forget,” a user named Atish posted on Twitter in Farsi on Feb. 11.
“When thousands of people share it on social media, the pressure for accountability goes up,” said Hadi Ghaemi, executive director at the New York-based Center for Human Rights in Iran. “Sham investigations won’t put it to rest. Social media is definitely becoming a major, major public square in Iran.”
Tehran prosecutor Abbas Jafari Dolatabadi said last month, without naming Bakhshi, that allegations of torture online constitute a crime.
His comments follow growing pressure from officials to close Instagram, which has about 24 million users in Iran. Iran last year shut down the Telegram messaging app, which had about 40 million users in the country, citing security concerns.
“Today you see in cyberspace that with the posting of a film or lie or rumor the situation in the country can fall apart,” Dolatabadi said, according to the Iranian Students’ News Agency. “You saw in recent days that they spread a rumor and announced the rape of an individual or claimed suicide and recently you even saw claims of torture and all the powers in the country get drawn in. Today cyberspace has been transformed into a very broad platform for committing crimes.”
The arrests of Bakhshi and Qoliyan are part of a crackdown in Ahvaz, center of Iran’s Arab population. Hundreds of activists there pushing for workers’ and minority rights, two of the most contentious issues in Iran, have been detained in recent weeks.
The Arab minority in southwest Iran has long claimed that it faces discrimination from the central government.