Arab star Ons Jabeur defeats former world No. 2

Ons Jabeur sent down two aces in her victory over Vera Zvonareva. (AFP)
Updated 20 July 2018
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Arab star Ons Jabeur defeats former world No. 2

  • Tunisian beats Vera Zvonareva 6-2, 6-2
  • Jabeur now through to quarterfinal of Bucharest Open

LONDON: Ons Jabeur claimed one of the biggest scalps of her career when she knocked former world No. 2 Vera Zvonareva out of the Bucharest Open.
The Tunisia ace had been pitched against the Russian in a tricky last 16 tie of the tournament on clay, but she rose to the challenge, winning 6-2, 6-2.
Jabeur will now meet another Russian, Polona Hercog, in the quarterfinal of the event which carries a prize fund of $250,000.
The win over Zvonareva will give Jabeur huge confidence as this was an opponent who reached the final of Wimbledon and the US Open in 2010 and who won the doubles at the Australian Open in 2012 and the US Open in 2006.

Zvonareva has since dropped to 142 in the world rankings and Jabeur was probably the favorite having risen to 123 in the world, but Zvonareva still boasted that big-match experience and it will do wonders for Jabeur's belief that she was able to put away a player of pedigree with such ease.
Jabeur's form in Bucharest continues the good run of form the 23-year-old has been on this year. She reached the second round of Wimbledon for the first time ever, pocketing £108,000 ($142,000) and becoming the first Arab woman to win a singles match at Wimbledon since her compatriot Selima Sfar in 2005. She also won a ITF $100,000 title in Manchester earlier this month without dropping a set.
Jabeur began the week with a straight-sets win over home favorite Irina-Camelia Begu, who was watched by world No. 1 Simona Halep.

 


Belief running high for Saudi Arabia’s Young Falcons

Updated 20 August 2018
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Belief running high for Saudi Arabia’s Young Falcons

  • Where others have picked over-aged players, Saudi Arabia, in contrast, have brought their U-21 team
  • Al-Shehri arrived at the Games playing down the importance of results and focusing on performances

JAKARTA: Saudi Arabia’s football team are doing things differently at the Asian Games this month. The three-week tournament is open to players aged under-23, with countries having the option to select three over-age players. The result is hosts Indonesia have selected a 37-year-old naturalized Brazilian and South Korea, whose players can avoid mandatory military service if they win gold, have called upon Heung-min Son, the Tottenham Hotspur forward.
Saudi Arabia, in contrast, have brought their Under-21 team.

Coach Saad Al-Shehri, who has been in charge of the side for three years, does not shy from the fact his Young Falcons are here primarily to gain experience and develop ahead of a crucial U23 Asian Championships, which offers direct qualification to the Olympic Games.

Yet he is also aware the deeper his side go this month, the more it will ultimately benefit the Kingdom’s Tokyo 2020 objective.
“We are playing here with an Under-21 team in a tournament that is for Under-23s,” he said. “But I believe in these players. I worked with them at the Under-20 World Cup in 2017 in Korea and this team is the future of Saudi Arabia. I do not doubt that, and the Federation is in agreement.
“The players need more experience, more games and strong tournaments, but we all believe in them and our work will continue on this path. This is the squad that we want to qualify for Tokyo.”
Al-Shehri arrived at the Games playing down the importance of results and focusing on performances, but after two games in Jakarta, his team sit joint-top of Group F alongside Iran, with whom they drew 0-0 in their opening game. A comfortable 3-0 victory over Myanmar on Friday means progress to the knock-out stages is all but secure, with today’s match against North Korea offering an opportunity to secure an easier Round of 16 draw.
Finalists in 2014, North Korea were expected to prove the most difficult opponent of the group stage, yet a draw with Myanmar and a 3-0 humbling by Iran have altered expectations for both sides. Al-Shehri, who will be without key playmaker Ayman Al-Khulaif today through suspension, is now expected to make several changes to avoid fatigue in what will be the Young Falcons’ third game in five days.
“I have 20 players and trust them all,” Al-Shehri told Arab News. “I am confident we can play a good game against North Korea because we have players hungry and waiting to take their chance. Everybody is ready to play and be involved. Whether we win or lose… all we want is to play games. We need to play more games to improve and the further in the tournament we go, the more games we play, so if we get to the final it’s very good for us regardless. Every single game we play between now and the Tokyo qualifiers is very important for us.”
Al-Khulaif, 21, has been instrumental in his side’s results so far, proving a constant outlet on the right of midfield and drawing nine fouls, including two penalties. The Al-Ahli playmaker made his Pro League debut last season, coming on as a 90th minute substitute for Taiser Al-Jassem against Ohod, and will hope this tournament can help him catch the eye of new Al-Ahli boss Pablo Guede.
Forced to sit out today’s match, he is looking to the positives. “I am sad to miss the next game, but I trust fully in my teammates to get a good result and it gives me a chance to rest and, inshallah, prepare better for the knock-out stages.”