Saudi scouts to participate in the Inter-American forum in Peru

The Saudi Arabian Boy Scouts Association is set to participate in the Third Inter-American Scout Moot in Peru, under the theme “Walking together through America.” (File photo: Wikimedia Commons)
Updated 21 July 2018
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Saudi scouts to participate in the Inter-American forum in Peru

  • Organized by the Scout Association of Peru, the event is for young people aged 18 to 25
  • The activities include cycling, horseback riding, kayaking, climbing and descending, and windsurfing

RIYADH: The Saudi Arabian Boy Scouts Association is set to participate in the Third Inter-American Scout Moot in Peru from Jul 27 to Aug 5, under the theme “Walking together through America.”
It is an official event of the World Organization of the Scout Movement (WOSM), hosted and organized by the Scout Association of Peru, for young people aged 18 to 25.
More than 2,000 scouts from 160 national associations from around the world are expected to participate in the event, which also marks the 100th anniversary of the scout movement.
The Secretary General of the Saudi Scout Association, Dr. Abdullah Al-Fahd, said, “the forum provides an opportunity for participants to connect with the world and make new friends as part of their scouting adventure.”
He added the forum will offer an opportunity to exchange intercultural experiences among participants, and to practice collective projects, all participating in Creating a Better World.
The head of the Saudi Scouts delegation, Nasser Al-Aqeel, said that the program includes activities for adventure, the most important of which are cycling, horseback riding, kayaking, climbing and descending, and windsurfing.
The forum includes several workshops, including developing ones self, effective communication, the solar environment, financial intelligence.
It will also feature courses in photography, prevention of anemia, Andean vision, reforestation, agriculture and human rights, as well as traditional games and night activities.
The word moot is Old English and means “an assembly held for discussion.”


TheFace: Rozana Al-Tayyar, professional mediator in business disputes

Updated 21 min 20 sec ago
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TheFace: Rozana Al-Tayyar, professional mediator in business disputes

  • Her experience as a financial analyst  partly managing complex relationships gave her the perfect education in how to become a mediator
  • "I see stories from every angle, and I help clients collaborate to see the other sides, and reach an agreement," she says

The business arena is a tough one, and ultimately, it is all about ensuring the success and growth of an endeavor. They do not always work out. Partners go through various disputes, often very costly and time-consuming, and unfortunately, they sometimes end up in court.

I am a business mediator — a third party to disputes briefed to help resolve them amicably, long before they reach that stage.

I am the daughter of a diplomat and grew up in London before moving to Athens with my family. I majored in computer science and engineering, which led to a placement at an oil refinery company in my senior year at college. I wanted to learn and I wanted to challenge myself, and soon after graduating, when we moved to Vienna, I was offered a job at the Saudi British Bank (SABB).

Starting as a financial analyst, part of my role was managing complex relationships. I spent 14 years at SABB honing my people skills, earning the trust of clients, learning how to negotiate and to read body language. It gave me the perfect education in how to become a mediator.

I founded my company TASWEA (meaning “settlement”) four years ago, when not many people knew or appreciated corporate mediation as a concept. In modern business culture, however, managing relationships and reputations is vital, and many people would rather resolve things with a professional behind closed doors than risk damage by feuding in public. It soon caught on.

As part of our culture, we are afraid of conflict but are quick to take sides, judge and apportion blame. But we mediators have a saying: “There are three sides to every story — there are the sides of both parties, and then there is the truth.” I see stories from every angle, and I help clients collaborate to see the other sides, and reach an agreement.

A recent UK study found that 70 percent of cases that go through professional mediation find an amicable solution. We allow each party to feel empowered, to express their emotions in a safe environment instead of betting the fate of their business on a legal route.

The best people to decide solutions to conflicts are often those involved in them. This is the most important point of mediation. All I do is help facilitate that dialogue, and as a mediator I find it extremely rewarding to make clients realize they have that power.