Muse: Saudi-Hawaiian yoga instructor Hanan Faiz talks self-discovery

Hanan Faiz is a Jeddah-based yoga instructor. (Photo supplied)
Updated 21 July 2018
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Muse: Saudi-Hawaiian yoga instructor Hanan Faiz talks self-discovery

JEDDAH: The Jeddah-based Saudi-Hawaiian yoga instructor talks self-discovery, finding peace and ketchup.

Yoga has taught me to accept myself. I never thought I’d be able to say I love myself, but 99 percent of our struggles are mental — many of our negative beliefs aren’t true. With time, you realize that and think to yourself, “I’m not so bad.”

People think because I practice and teach yoga that I’m some sort of guru — cue angelic hymns in the background — and that I have everything figured out and am so peaceful. On the contrary, I practice yoga because I’m a bit crazy. Part of me is peaceful, but yoga is just one page in the book of my life, but that’s the image they see on my social media.

Humans love drama. We all want this fancy super-food gimmick that’s going to heal us. And a lot of first-timers think yoga will (magically) bring them peace and they’ll be practicing this cool, calm yoga flow. They don’t understand that I can’t bring them peace. It’s within themselves, and practice isn’t always fun. But I feel like people keep coming back because they’re tapping into self-discovery.

I get the weirdest things as gifts. I once got a package of different sauces and ketchup. I can’t even get my mind around that one.

I’m a believer in natural remedies but by far the quirkiest thing I’ve ever bought was eye drops from India made of onion, garlic, lemon and ginger extract. I tried it and felt like my eyes were on fire. But a few seconds later the burning sensation was gone and I could see better. I swear it works.

Less is more. We don’t need a lot to be happy.

I have found courage and acceptance that things can or can’t work out. I don’t allow fear to rule or take over my decisions. If it’s meant to be, then I’m grateful, and even if it isn’t, I’m still grateful. Everything that happened in the past led to who and what I am today. So I don’t have any regrets.


Blankets, bed-sharing common in accidental baby suffocations

In this March 22, 2012 file photo, a doctor demonstrates how an infant can die due to unsafe sleeping practices using a scene re-enactment doll in Norfolk, Va. (AP)
Updated 22 April 2019
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Blankets, bed-sharing common in accidental baby suffocations

  • The authors studied 2011-2014 data from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention registry of deaths in 10 states
  • Young babies can’t easily move away from bedding or a sleeping parent; all of the study deaths were in infants younger than 8 months old

CHICAGO: Accidental suffocation is a leading cause of injury deaths in US infants and common scenarios involve blankets, bed-sharing with parents and other unsafe sleep practices, an analysis of government data found.
These deaths “are entirely preventable. That’s the most important point,” said Dr. Fern Hauck, a co-author and University of Virginia expert in infant deaths.
Among 250 suffocation deaths, roughly 70 percent involved blankets, pillows or other soft bedding that blocked infants’ airways. Half of these soft bedding-related deaths occurred in an adult bed where most babies were sleeping on their stomachs.
Almost 20 percent suffocated when someone in the bed accidentally moved against or on top of them, and about 12 percent died when their faces were wedged against a wall or mattress.
The authors studied 2011-2014 data from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention registry of deaths in 10 states. The results offer a more detailed look at death circumstances than previous studies using vital records, said lead author Alexa Erck Lambert, a CDC researcher.
The authors said anecdotal reports suggest there’s been little change in unsafe sleep practices in more recent years.
“It is very, very distressing that in the US we’re just seeing this resistance, or persistence of these high numbers,” Hauck said.
The study was published Monday in Pediatrics.
For years, the US government and the American Academy of Pediatrics have waged safe-sleep campaigns aimed at preventing accidental infant suffocations and strangulations and sudden infant death syndrome. These include “back to sleep” advice promoting having babies sleep on their backs, which experts believe contributed to a decline in SIDS deaths over nearly 30 years. But bed-sharing has increased, along with bed-related accidental suffocations — from 6 deaths per 100,000 infants in 1999 to 23 per 100,000 in 2015, the researchers note.
Dr. Rachel Moon, a University of Virginia pediatrics professor not involved in the study, said the results are not surprising.
“Every day I talk to parents who have lost babies. They thought they were doing the right thing, and it seems safe and it seems OK, until you lose a baby,” Moon said.
Some studies have found bed-sharing increases breastfeeding and it’s common in some families because of cultural traditions. Others simply can’t afford a crib.
Erika Moulton, a stay-at-home mom in suburban New York, said bed-sharing was the only way her son, Hugo, would sleep as a newborn. Moulton struggled with getting enough sleep herself for months, and while she knew doctors advise against it, bed-sharing seemed like the only option.
Now 14 months old, “he’s still in our bed,” she said. “Trying to transition him out is a little difficult.”
The pediatricians group recommends that infants sleep on firm mattresses in their own cribs or bassinets but in their parents’ room for the first year. A tight-fitting top sheet is the only crib bedding recommended, to avoid suffocation or strangulation.
Young babies can’t easily move away from bedding or a sleeping parent; all of the study deaths were in infants younger than 8 months old.