Farnborough airshow announces $192 bn in orders

Britain’s defense minister, Gavin Wiliamson (UNSEEN), unveiled a model of a new jet fighter, called ‘Tempest’ at the Farnborough Airshow, in Farnborough, Britain July 16, 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 21 July 2018
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Farnborough airshow announces $192 bn in orders

  • The biannual air industry gathering recorded more than 1,400 commercial aircraft orders
  • The total is an increase of $67.5 billion on the last airshow two years ago

LONDON: England’s Farnborough airshow this week saw deals worth $192 billion (164 billion euros), a jump of more than 50 percent compared to 2016, in a sign of “confidence in global trade,” organizers said Saturday.
The biannual air industry gathering recorded more than 1,400 commercial aircraft orders, valued at $154 billion, alongside at least 1,432 deals for engines worth $21.96 billion.
The total is an increase of $67.5 billion on the last airshow two years ago, with the mile-high rivalry between Boeing and Airbus — who made the majority of plane orders — swelling sales.
US aviation giant Boeing announced 676 orders, totalling $92 billion at list prices, as of Thursday, while its European competitor had unveiled 431 orders worth $70 billion.
“The major deals announced this week demonstrate how confident the aerospace industry is and the role of Farnborough as an economic barometer,” said Farnborough International chief executive Gareth Rogers.
The show attracted its most global attendance ever with around 100 countries represented and a record Chinese presence, Farnborough said in a statement.
There was also a near-10 percent rise in trade visitors compared to previous years, with more than 80,000 visitors passing through the gates, it added.


Philips to close its UK factory in 2020, with loss of 400 jobs

Updated 48 min 57 sec ago
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Philips to close its UK factory in 2020, with loss of 400 jobs

AMSTERDAM/LONDON: Dutch health technology company Philips said on Thursday it planned to close its only factory in Britain in 2020, with the loss of around 400 jobs, the latest firm to move manufacturing jobs out of Britain.
The move is part of a push by Philips to reduce its large manufacturing sites worldwide to 30 from 50, and a spokesman said the decision had no direct link with Britain’s decision to leave the European Union.
However, the company said in a statement that it had to “pro-actively mitigate the potential impact of various ongoing geopolitical challenges, including uncertainties and possible obstructions that may affect its manufacturing operations.”
The factory in Glemsford, Suffolk, produces babycare products, mainly for export to other European countries. Almost all its activities will move to Philips’ plant in Drachten, the Netherlands, which already employs around 2,000 workers.
“We have announced the proposal after careful consideration, and over the next period, we will work closely with the impacted colleagues on next steps,” said Neil Mesher, CEO of Philips UK & Ireland.
“The UK is an important market for us, and we will continue to invest in our commercial organization and innovation programs in the country.”
Once a sprawling conglomerate, Philips has transformed itself into a health technology specialist in recent years, shedding its consumer electronics and lighting divisions.
The firm has previously warned that Brexit would put Britain’s status as a manufacturing hub at risk.
Chief Executive Frans van Houten last year said that without a customs union — which has been ruled out by Prime Minister Theresa May — Philips would have to rethink its manufacturing footprint.
Britain is set to leave the EU on March 29, and politicians are at an impasse over how to do so after lawmakers overwhelmingly rejected May’s proposed withdrawal agreement on Tuesday.
Other firms have moved jobs out of Britain in recent weeks, sparking alarm among lawmakers that Brexit is impacting corporate decision-making.
Jaguar Land Rover has slashed UK jobs — mainly due to lower Chinese demand and a slump in European diesel sales — while Ford has said it will slash thousands of jobs as part of its turnaround plan.
While both decisions were driven by factors other than Brexit, each firm has also been vocal in warning of the risks of no-deal Brexit, where Britain leaves abruptly in March without a transition period.