‘Hotel Transylvania 3’ blurs the line between good and bad

A still from the kid-friendly film. (Sony Pictures Animation)
Updated 23 July 2018
0

‘Hotel Transylvania 3’ blurs the line between good and bad

  • The characters are sharply etched out, with pointed features and wonderful detail

CHENNAI: Nothing can be compared to Japanese animation, especially the works of cinematic art created by Hayao Miyazaki (“Spirited Away,” “Princess Mononoke,” “The Wind Rises”), which is not just sharply political but also intensely emotional. In comparison, American animated films may seem somewhat plastic, though the Hotel Transylvania franchise has risen above the mundane. The latest installment,” Hotel Transylvania 3: A Monster Vacation,” from director Genndy Tartakovsky, depicts a battle between good and evil.
The plot sees Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler), his daughter Mavis (Selena Gomez), her human husband Johnny (Andy Samberg) and the entire monster entourage go on a cruise vacation to Atlantis. On board, widowed and lonely Dracula falls head over heels in love with the director of the event, Ericka (Kathryn Hahn). However — plot twist! — she is a human being and several centuries younger. Even worse, she is the granddaughter of the legendary vampire hunter Abraham Van Helsing (Jim Gaffigan), whose bitter enmity with Dracula dates back to the 1800s. It is liberally interspersed with humor, which comes courtesy of the Mummy, the Invisible Man and the giant puppy that Dracula's grandson smuggles aboard the ship.
Tartakovsky, who helmed all three editions of the franchise, undoubtedly employed a brilliant set of animators — the characters are sharply etched out, with pointed features and wonderful detail. The wit flows at a breathless pace, but what is lacking is a certain novelty, which one expects in an ongoing series.
One plus point is that parents will not find themselves wanting for entertainment. Dracula's romance with Ericka may be lost on children, but it will keep the adults entertained. At 97 minutes long, however, the film could have been far more fantastic.


Footballer Kompany’s dad first black mayor in Belgium

Updated 15 October 2018
0

Footballer Kompany’s dad first black mayor in Belgium

  • Pierre Kompany, 71, arrived in Belgium in 1975 as a refugee from what was then Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Kompany was head of the centrist CDH list in Sunday’s municipal election in Ganshoren, a bilingual French and Dutch speaking town of 25,000

BRUSSELS: Pierre Kompany, the father of Manchester City captain and Belgian international defender Vincent, became Belgium’s first black elected mayor on Monday after his party topped the poll in the Brussels suburb Ganshoren.
Pierre Kompany, 71, arrived in Belgium in 1975 as a refugee from what was then Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of Congo, and has since been naturalized as a citizen and entered politics.
He was head of the centrist CDH list in Sunday’s municipal election in Ganshoren, a bilingual French and Dutch speaking town of 25,000 just outside the Belgian capital, and will take office in December.
“He’s the first black mayor in Belgium,” Vincent declared on Instagram. “It has never happened before. It’s historic. We’re all delighted. Bravo to my father.”
In 2014, a local councillor of Congolese origin, Denis Liselele, served as temporary mayor in the Belgian town of Sambreville after the elected town leader was suspended during a court case.