Al Manzil: A cozy Lebanese oasis on the bustling streets of Cairo

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Al Manzil restaurant in Heliopolis serves traditional Lebanese fare with a wide selection of mezze platters. Its peaceful setting is a welcome respite from the hectic rush of Cairo.
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Al Manzil restaurant in Heliopolis serves traditional Lebanese fare with a wide selection of mezze platters. Its peaceful setting is a welcome respite from the hectic rush of Cairo.
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Al Manzil restaurant in Heliopolis serves traditional Lebanese fare with a wide selection of mezze platters. Its peaceful setting is a welcome respite from the hectic rush of Cairo.
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Al Manzil restaurant in Heliopolis serves traditional Lebanese fare with a wide selection of mezze platters. Its peaceful setting is a welcome respite from the hectic rush of Cairo.
Updated 27 July 2018
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Al Manzil: A cozy Lebanese oasis on the bustling streets of Cairo

CAIRO: Located in the heart of Korba, Heliopolis, Al Manzil offers a special patio dining experience. We visited the restaurant on a busy Thursday evening and quickly grabbed a prime table by the fountain.
The interior is reminiscent of a Syrian/Levantine courtyard house. Dark brown bamboo chairs are paired with wooden tables, with Arabic music adding to the whole authentic ambiance. Whether you’re after delicious Lebanese food or looking to enjoy some shisha, Al Manzil is the go-to place.
Our meal began with a selection of mezze platters, served swiftly and with creative flair. The salad was a playful fusion of grilled eggplant cubes soaked in a generous dressing of tangy lemon juice balanced out by a sweet and pungent pomegranate sauce and mixed with cherry tomatoes, parsley, bell peppers and onions — the latter two adding a hint of crunchiness that worked well with the soft aubergine
It was accompanied by Al Manzil’s complementary signature dip tray, comprising scoops of homemade labneh, cold moussaka and a selection of pickles. This mezze-trio comes paired with anise-kissed crunchy breadsticks, freshly baked pita bread and a bowl of fresh vegetables.
We were also served a chickpea-sesame puree spread across a shallow bowl, with perfectly seasoned beef shawarma strips lying in the middle. We added an abundant drizzle of olive oil and indulged in this marvel of flavor.
For our main course, we settled on fattet hummus and arayes bil lahmeh. Fattet hummus is a hearty Levantine staple — a cross between chickpea-bread pudding and chickpea casserole — made by layering fried pita bread, adding a generous amount of laban, and showering it with a plentiful sprinkle of chickpeas and pine nuts. This classic dish’s flavors certainly hit all of the right notes. The creamy yogurt sauce subtly countered the nutty flavor of chickpeas, with the bread pieces and pine nuts further enhancing the overall experience.
As delicious as the fatteh was, the arayes lahmeh was a real contender too: straight-off-the-grill pita bread sandwiches stuffed with minced lamb meat and served with pickled cucumbers. The dish was served in a dibs rimman-based marinade — a blend of minced meat, onion, sesame paste and tomatoes. The succulent lamb’s taste was heightened by the fierce vividness of pomegranate sauce and made our taste buds dance with joy.
When it was time for dessert, we savored Al Manzil’s signature sweet dish ghazl banat bil ice cream — mastic ice cream wrapped in Arabic cotton candy and drizzled with pistachios. Once my spoon broke through the candy floss, it came apart, revealing a mountain of gooey ice cream. The dish delivered the sweetness of the floss’s velvety wool-like strands fused with the chewy, creamy mastic ice cream and the nuttiness of crispy pistachios.
We ended our extensive meal with two cups of Turkish coffee, enjoying a few more minutes of good tarrab — and an unexpected summer breeze — before hitting the busy Cairo roads again.


WHO: Alcohol abuse kills 3 million a year, most of them men

The logo of the World Health Organization (WHO) is pictured on the facade of the WHO headquarters on October 24, 2017 in Geneva. (AFP)
Updated 22 September 2018
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WHO: Alcohol abuse kills 3 million a year, most of them men

  • Of all deaths attributable to alcohol, 28 percent were due to injuries, such as traffic accidents and interpersonal violence
  • An estimated 2.3 billion people worldwide drink alcohol, with average daily consumption of people at 33 grams of pure alcohol a day

GENEVA: More than 3 million people died in 2016 due to drinking too much alcohol, meaning one in 20 deaths worldwide was linked to harmful drinking, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday.
More than three quarters of these deaths were among men, the UN health agency said. Despite evidence of the health risks it carries, global consumption of alcohol is predicted to rise in the next 10 years.
“It’s time to step up action to prevent this serious threat to the development of healthy societies,” WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said.
In its “Global status report on alcohol and health 2018,” the WHO said that globally, an estimated 237 million men and 46 million women are problem drinkers or alcohol abusers. The highest prevalence is in Europe and the Americas, and alcohol-use disorders are more common in wealthier countries.
Of all deaths attributable to alcohol, 28 percent were due to injuries, such as traffic accidents and interpersonal violence. Another 21 percent were due to digestive disorders, and 19 percent due to cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and strokes.
An estimated 2.3 billion people worldwide drink alcohol, with average daily consumption of people at 33 grams of pure alcohol a day. This is roughly equivalent to two 150 ml glasses of wine, a large (750 ml) bottle of beer or two 40 ml shots of spirits.
Europe has the highest per person alcohol consumption in the world, even though it has dropped by around 10 percent since 2010. Current trends point to a global rise in per capita consumption in the next 10 years, the report said, particularly in Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific and the Americas.
“All countries can do much more to reduce the health and social costs of the harmful use of alcohol,” said Vladimir Poznyak, of the WHO’s substance abuse unit. He said proven, cost-effective steps included raising alcohol taxes, restricting advertising and limiting easy access to alcohol.
Worldwide, 45 percent of total alcohol consumed is in the form of spirits. Beer is the second most popular, accounting for 34 percent of consumption, followed by wine at 12 percent.
The report found that almost all countries have alcohol excise taxes, but fewer than half of them use other pricing strategies such as banning below-cost sales or bulk buy discounts.