Lewis Hamilton wins Hungarian GP to extend lead over rival Sebastian Vettel

Mercedes' British driver Lewis Hamilton is congratulated by team members after winning the Formula One Hungarian Grand Prix at the Hungaroring circuit on July 29, 2018. (AFP/Andrej ISAKOVIC)
Updated 29 July 2018
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Lewis Hamilton wins Hungarian GP to extend lead over rival Sebastian Vettel

  • Lewis Hamilton won the Hungarian Grand Prix from pole position on Sunday to extend his championship lead
  • Hamilton was untroubled as he secured a second straight win, fifth of the season and 67th overall

BUDAPEST: Lewis Hamilton won the Hungarian Grand Prix from pole position on Sunday to extend his championship lead over Sebastian Vettel.
Hamilton was untroubled as he secured a second straight win, fifth of the season and 67th overall.
But Mercedes missed out on a 1-2 as Valtteri Bottas was overtaken by Vettel and Kimi Raikkonen with five laps to go.
Bottas and Vettel touched during the overtaking move, with some debris flying off the Mercedes.
“I got a hit from behind. I wasn’t sure what was going on,” Vettel said. “Lucky that the car wasn’t broken and we could carry on.”
In a dramatic finish, Bottas lost control of his car as he bumped Daniel Ricciardo’s Red Bull off the track as he was about to be overtaken.
Bottas was told on team radio to give the position back to Ricciardo, who finished a commendable fourth after starting 12th. Bottas risked further penalty after being summoned to speak to stewards over the incident.
Ricciardo’s teammate, Max Verstappen, launched a series of expletives after engine failure curtailed his race after eight laps.
It is the fourth time Verstappen has failed to finish this season. Red Bull team principal Christian Horner blamed the Renault engine as being substandard. Red Bull is splitting with Renault and working with Honda next season.
Hamilton now leads Vettel by 24 points after 12 of 21 races. They will continue their battle for a fifth F1 title when the championship resumes at the Belgian GP on Aug. 26.
Vettel and Raikkonen drove well considering both endured a botched pit stop because of a slow tire change.
Ferrari team strategy meant Raikkonen pitted twice for new tires and — on a scorching hot day — Ferrari bafflingly forgot to properly attach his drinks supply.
Hamilton secured pole with a brilliant last lap in the rain on Saturday, while Vettel started a modest fourth behind Raikkonen and Bottas.
The long straight up to Turn 1 was Ferrari’s best and — ultimately — only chance of overtaking Hamilton. But he comfortably held position while Vettel jumped ahead of Raikkonen and almost caught Bottas.


Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

Updated 14 November 2018
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Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

LONDON: A Saudi Arabian businessman is driving the bid to get squash included in the Olympics for the first time.
The World Squash Federation has petitioned three times for squash to join the Games, but each bid has been rejected by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The decision has prompted frustration in the squash community, particularly as sports such as climbing, surfing and skateboarding have been admitted.
Ziad Al-Turki is the Chairman of the Professional Squash Association (PSA) and has done wonders in marketing the game and broadening its appeal. He is now pushing hard for the game to be showcased on the biggest stage of all at the 2024 Olympics Games in Paris.
Squash has huge global appeal, with the men’s singles final in the last Commonwealth Games attracting a TV audience of more than one million.
“Everyone’s ultimate goal is the Olympics,” said Al-Turki. “The main push comes from the World Squash Federation (WSF) and for many years they were stuck in their ways. We changed a lot at the PSA and ticked every box with the IOC. The WSF just stayed stagnant and didn’t do anything. They didn’t want to put our hand in their hand and work together.”
Relations between the PSA and the WSF came to a head in 2015 in the wake of squash losing out to wrestling for a spot at the 2020 Olympics. A statement from the PSA described the then president of WSF, Narayana Ramachandran, as an “embarrassment to the sport.”
“Nothing could happen with the president of the WSF. Nothing would change. It was just a one-man show. We tried to help but he wouldn’t accept any help,” Al-Turki said. “We have a new president now and they are all very keen,” he added.
Jacques Fontaine is the new president and at his coronation in 2016 he encouragingly said “the Olympic agenda remains a priority.”
“The WSF love the sport and they understand the needs of the IOC,” said Al-Turki.
“They understand the PSA is at a completely different level to the WSF and we’ve now joined forces and are working together. Hopefully 2024 will be the year squash is in the Olympics. Right now, the way we are working together is the strongest collaboration ever and hopefully we can tick all the boxes for the IOC.
“We ticked all the right bodies as a professional association but the WSF didn’t. Now they are putting their hands in ours and we will tick all the right boxes for the ICO.”
Al-Turki, once described as the Bernie Ecclestone of squash, has certainly transformed the sport since he took up office in 2008.
“When I joined the PSA we didn’t have any media coverage,” he said. “Right now we are live in 154 countries. the women’s tour has just grown stronger and stronger — the income has gone up by 74 percent.
“I just love the squash players. I think they are incredible athletes are are some of the fittest athletes in the world. I felt they deserved better and I wanted them to have better.
“I don’t think we’ll be able to reach the levels of football and tennis in terms of exposure and prize money, but I want to reach a level where they will retire comfortably. It’s one of the fastest growing sports in the world right now.
“It’s all about the player and their well being. Nick Matthew retired recently and I think he’s retired comfortably. I think I’ve contributed to this as the income has improved. That’s all I want – nothing more.”