‘Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3:’ A jaded cat-and-mouse roulette

Sanjay Dutt’s Uday Pratap Singh
Updated 31 July 2018
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‘Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3:’ A jaded cat-and-mouse roulette

  • Chitrangada stands in contrast to the others — Jimmy, Dutt and even Mahi — who all appear boringly wooden in a world Dhulia creates through sickening amorality and wicked scheming

CHENNAI: Tigmanshu Dhulia’s latest edition in the franchise, “Saheb Biwi Aur Gangster 3,” may have a new villain in Sanjay Dutt’s Uday Pratap Singh, who gets deported out of London after a murderous assault on a British parliamentarian and loses his fancy-sounding nightclub, House of Lords, but the film flogs the same old tale of treachery and deceit. While the first two parts had Randeep Hooda and Irrfan Khan personifying evil with welcome freshness, Dutt is jaded, hardly villainous-looking and seemingly disinterested.
The plot itself — much like the movies we have seen about the debauchery and excess among India’s zamindars — talks about Saheb/master or Aditya Pratap Singh’s (Jimmy Shergill) efforts to get out of jail — an incarcerated existence that his Biwi/wife or Madhavi Devi (Mahi Gill) pushed him into in the second part of the franchise. Despite her deviously valiant efforts to keep her husband behind bars while she plays to perfection her role as a Member of India’s Parliament, punctuated by her seductive flirtations, Saheb walks out. And he finds a new man to reckon with — Uday, whom Biwi has managed to attract, even though he has a lover in Suhani, a dancer portrayed by a ravishingly beautiful Chitrangada Singh. Hauntingly expressive, but wasted in an inane role.
Chitrangada stands in contrast to the others — Jimmy, Dutt and even Mahi — who all appear boringly wooden in a world Dhulia creates through sickening amorality and wicked scheming. There is very little nobility left out of this royalty, and a classic question is posed to Saheb: Is your blood still royal or have years being a politician turned it into water? In the vicious cat-and-mouse game that the three lead characters play, there are twists and turns. One of them comes in the form of Russian roulette, a deadly game that Uday has mastered. He comes out unscathed from every such dangerous duel. But often the surprises seem forced.
Dhulia needs to introduce new faces if he makes another addition, and the climax tells us that there will be one more. Or he has to think up a radically different storyline.


Hawking’s final book offers brief answers to big questions

Updated 15 October 2018
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Hawking’s final book offers brief answers to big questions

  • Hawking was forever being asked the same things and started work on “Brief Answers to the Big Questions” last year before he died
  • “He was regularly asked a set of questions,” his daughter Lucy Hawking said

LONDON: Stephen Hawking’s final work, which tackles issues from the existence of God to the potential for time travel, was launched on Monday by his children, who helped complete the book after the British astrophysics giant’s death.
Hawking was forever being asked the same things and started work on “Brief Answers to the Big Questions” last year — but did not finish it before he died in March, aged 76.
It has been completed by the theoretical physicist’s family and academic colleagues, with material drawn from his vast personal archive.
“He was regularly asked a set of questions,” his daughter Lucy Hawking said at the Science Museum in London.
The book was an attempt to “bring together the most definitive, clearest, most authentic answers that he gave.
“We all just wish he has here to see it.”
Hawking, who was wheelchair bound due to motor neurone disease, dedicated his life’s work to unraveling the mysteries of the universe.
The cosmologist was propelled to stardom by his 1988 book “A Brief History of Time,” an unlikely worldwide bestseller.
It won over fans from far beyond the rarefied world of astrophysics and prompted people into asking the mastermind his thoughts on broader topics, answered in his final work.

The 10 questions Hawking tackles are:
-- Is there a God?
-- How did it all begin?
-- What is inside a black hole?
-- Can we predict the future?
-- Is time travel possible?
-- Will we survive on Earth?
-- Is there other intelligent life in the universe?
-- Should we colonize space?
-- Will artificial intelligence outsmart us?
-- How do we shape the future?


In his book, Hawking says humans have no option but to leave Earth, risking being “annihilated” if they do not.
He says computers will overtake humans in intelligence during the next 100 years, but “we will need to ensure that the computers have goals aligned with ours.”
Hawking says the human race had to improve its mental and physical qualities, but a genetically-modified race of superhumans, say with greater memory and disease resistance, would imperil the others.
He says that by the time people realize what is happening with climate change, it may be too late.
Hawking says the simplest explanation is that God does not exist and there is no reliable evidence for an afterlife, though people could live on through their influence and genes.
He says that in the next 50 years, we will come to understand how life began and possibly discover whether life exists elsewhere in the universe.
“He was deeply worried that at a time when the challenges are global, we were becoming increasingly local in our thinking,” Lucy Hawking said.
“It’s a call to unity, to humanity, to bring ourselves back together and really face up to the challenges in front of us.”
In his final academic paper, Hawking shed new light on black holes and the information paradox, with new work calculating the entropy of black holes.
Turned into an animation narrated by Hawking’s artificial voice, it was shown at the book launch.
“It was very emotional. I turned away because I had tears forming,” Lucy Hawking told AFP on hearing her father’s voice again.
“It feels sometimes like he’s still here because we talk about him and hear his voice — and then we have the reminder that he’s left us.”