Water crisis salts the earth in Iraq’s long-neglected south

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This aerial photo shows a dry canal full of salt in the area of Siba in Basra, 550 km southeast of Baghdad, Iraq. (AP/Nabil Al-Jurani)
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Farmer Qassim Sabaan Ali, 62, a farmer shows dead figs in the area of Siba in Basra, 550 km southeast of Baghdad, Iraq. (AP/Nabil Al-Jurani)
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Qassim Sabaan Ali, 62, stands on on his dry farm caused by high salinity levels in the area of Siba in Basra, 550 km southeast of Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq, (AP/Nabil Al-Jurani)
Updated 02 August 2018
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Water crisis salts the earth in Iraq’s long-neglected south

  • Iraq’s southern province of Basra was once dubbed the “Venice of the East” because of its many canals
  • Upstream dams in Turkey, Syria and Iran have shrunk the rivers and their tributaries

BAGHDAD: Iraq’s southern province of Basra was once dubbed the “Venice of the East” because of its many canals. Iraq’s two rivers — the Tigris and the Euphrates — have nourished civilizations since antiquity.
But the region is now suffering from a water crisis so severe that once-fertile land has been turned into desert and tap water is too salty and polluted even for washing.
Upstream dams in Turkey, Syria and Iran have shrunk the rivers and their tributaries, seasonal rainfall has dropped and infrastructure has fallen into disrepair.
The result is an acute lack of freshwater that has allowed a salty tide from the nearby Arabian Gulf to advance north and seep into once-lush farmland.
The crisis has also contributed to violent protests across the oil-rich region last month.


Migrants stranded at sea for three weeks face deportation

Updated 19 min 11 sec ago
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Migrants stranded at sea for three weeks face deportation

  • Vessel carrying 75 illegal refugees, including 32 children, remained stranded 25 km off Tunisia

TUNIS: Tunisia has allowed dozens of migrants, mostly from Bangladesh, to disembark after three weeks stranded in the Mediterranean, so that they can return to their home countries, the Red Crescent said on Wednesday.

An Egyptian boat rescued at least 75 migrants in Tunisian waters last month. But local authorities in the governorate of Medinine said its migrant centers were too overcrowded to let them ashore, leaving the vessel stranded 25 km off the coastal city of Zarzis.

“After they were stranded for three weeks at sea in difficult conditions, Tunisia agreed to dock the ship, and migrants accepted to return to their countries in coming days,” Red Crescent official Mongi Slim told Reuters.

After a visit by officials from Bangladesh Embassy, the migrants agreed to return home, according to Mongi Slim, a Red Crescent official.

Earlier, Red Crescent representatives welcomed to port 64 Bangladeshis, nine Egyptians, a Moroccan, a Sudanese citizen, who left Zuwara in Libya in late May.

The migrants, which include at least 32 children and unaccompanied minors, are to be transferred to a reception center in Sfax from where they are set to return home, Slim added.

Worried about creating a precedent, Tunisian authorities said they accepted the migrants as an exception and for “humanitarian” reasons.

“We thank Tunisia’s renewed commitment to life and dignity,” said Lorena Lando, the head of the International Organization for Migration in Tunisia.

She added that it is urgent to put in place a collaborative approach to helping migrants in the Mediterranean.

Neighboring Libya’s west coast is a frequent departure point for African migrants hoping to reach Europe by paying human traffickers. But their numbers have dropped after an Italian-led effort to disrupt smuggling networks and support the Libyan coast guard.

At least 65 migrants drowned last month when their boat capsized off Tunisia after setting out from Libya.

In the first four months of 2019, 164 people are known to have died on the route, a smaller number but a higher death rate than in previous years, with one dying for every three who reach European shores, the UN refugee agency UNHCR said.