Apple working with Chinese telecom firms to reduce spam

China is Apple’s second-largest market and it said earlier this week that revenue in the country jumped 19 percent in the June quarter on strong iPhone X sales. (Reuters)
Updated 02 August 2018
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Apple working with Chinese telecom firms to reduce spam

BEIJING: Apple is working with Chinese telecom firms to find ways to reduce spam received through its messaging service, days after it was accused by state media of allowing illegal content on its platform, China News Service reported on Thursday.
The iPhone maker has been targeted by China’s state media through the past week and the official state broadcaster railed against it in a 30-minute special report on Tuesday, saying Apple allowed illegal content such as gambling apps.
Apple is exploring ways to cut spam messages, including using advanced technology to identify junk messages and rolling out more tools to block hostile accounts, an Apple official was quoted by the state-run China News Service as saying.
“We’ve been working to reduce the issue of spam for quite some time,” an Apple spokeswoman said in an email.
She declined to comment on the China News Service report that it was working with the country’s telecom firms.
China is Apple’s second-largest market and it said earlier this week that revenue in the country jumped 19 percent in the June quarter on strong iPhone X sales, showing investors it still had game even as cheaper Chinese rivals gain ground.
Beijing has criticized Apple before but the fresh attacks come as Chinese regulators have launched a new campaign to clean up spam and unsolicited calls, which are a pervasive issue in China where phone numbers are often sold on black markets.
The criticism highlights an increasingly fraught balancing act for the firm in the world’s biggest smartphone market at a time of mounting trade tensions between China and the United States. Both countries have imposed tariffs on exported goods and are fighting over patents and technology.
While China is limited in its ability to match tariff for tariff, it has stepped up scrutiny of business dealings involving US firms including Facebook Inc. and recently scuppered a deal between US chipmakers Qualcomm Inc. and NXP Semiconductors.
Alphabet’s Google, which quit China’s search engine market in 2010, will block some websites and search terms from the version of its search engine that it plans to launch in China, two sources have said.


Siemens CEO pushes plans to boost Iraqi power infrastructure

Updated 23 September 2018
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Siemens CEO pushes plans to boost Iraqi power infrastructure

FRANKFURT: Siemens said its boss Joe Kaeser met Iraq’s prime minister on Sunday to discuss a proposal by the German company to expand the Middle East nation’s power production.
The German engineering group said it was proposing a deal to add 11 gigawatt (GW) of capacity over four years, saying this would boost the country’s capacity by nearly 50 percent.
It did not give a value, but such a contract would be worth several billion euros based on previous comparable deals.
Iraq has a wide gap between electricity consumption and supply. Peak demand in the summer, when people turn on air conditioners due to high temperatures, is about 21 GW, far exceeding the 13 GW the grid is currently provides, experts say.
Kaeser said in a statement after meeting Prime Minister Al-Abadi that they had “discussed the comprehensive Siemens roadmap to build a better future for the Iraqi people.”
“In Egypt, we have done the same and successfully built up the power infrastructure in record time with the highest efficiency,” he said.
In 2015, Siemens signed an 8 billion euro ($9.4 billion) deal with Egypt to supply gas and wind power plants to add 16.4 gigawatts of capacity to the country’s power grid, marking the group’s single biggest order.
The proposal for Iraq, first pitched in February, would include cutting Iraq’s energy losses, introducing smart grids, expanding transmission grids, upgrading existing plants and adding new capacity.
The group would also help the government secure funding from international commercial banks and export credit agencies with German government support, creating thousands of jobs in Iraq.
Siemens would donate a $60 million grant for software for Iraqi universities, it said.