Fans in tears as Lebanese diva Elissa shares her struggle with breast cancer in new music clip

What seemed like a fictional story about a cancer patient turns out to be an autobiography of Elissa herself. (Screen grab of video clip)
Updated 08 August 2018
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Fans in tears as Lebanese diva Elissa shares her struggle with breast cancer in new music clip

  • Elissa revealed the she is battling breast cancer, leaving many fans in complete shock
  • “You are the reason I am strong and healthy… you are my strength," she said

CAIRO: Fans of Lebanese diva Elissa broke into tears when watching her latest music video, in which she publicly shares for the first time her struggle with breast cancer.
In the much awaited-for music video, “Illa Kol Elli Beyhbouni” aka For All Those who Love Me, Elissa revealed that she is battling breast cancer, leaving many fans in complete shock.
She shared a clip of her song in a tweet on Monday, captioned: “You are the reason I am strong and healthy… you are my strength. And this story is a thank you: 'For all those who love me.'”
The video clip starts by featuring a woman inside an MRI machine with the date December 26, 2017 and the subtitle: ‘you have cancer.’
The viewer is then surprised to find that what seemed like a fictional story about a cancer patient is an autobiography of Elissa herself, with actual footage of the singer intercut throughout the clip.
The video features actual recordings of phone calls and exchanges between Angy, the director of the video, and Elissa, sharing her agony, fear and tears over the illness.
It included a clip of her fall on stage during a concert in Dubai earlier this year, hinting that it could have been because of the illness.
While the song was released before the clip, watching the video explains why in the lyrics Elissa expresses love for her close ones and fans, asking them “to hug her and never leave” while calling on them to “enjoy life, as every minute that passes will not come again.”


Book Review: Sinan Antoon pays tribute to war’s forgotten losses

Updated 55 min 35 sec ago
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Book Review: Sinan Antoon pays tribute to war’s forgotten losses

  • The story follows the life of introspective academic Nameer Al-Baghdadi, an Iraqi living in the US
  • It was written by internationally celebrated author Sinan Antoon

CHICAGO: Out of Baghdad comes “The Book of Collateral Damage” by internationally celebrated author Sinan Antoon, whose fourth novel follows the life of introspective academic Nameer Al-Baghdadi, an Iraqi living in the US. An encounter in Baghdad with an eccentric bookseller while travelling with documentary filmmakers as a translator leads Nameer to a manuscript that forces him to explore memories of the past, the loss of his home and the destruction caused by war.

The year is 2003 and Nameer is moving from Massachusetts to New Hampshire to teach at Dartmouth. Before moving, he travels back to Iraq for the first time since 1993. Encountering his old home, his relatives and the streets he used to travel, Nameer finds himself at a bookseller’s shop on Al-Mutannabi Street. The stall owner, Wadood, hands him a manuscript in which he has documented everything destroyed by war, from inanimate objects, to people to the flora and fauna. Intrigued by Wadood’s book, he takes it back to the US with him and finds himself suddenly consumed by it.

Through Nameer, Antoon takes his readers on a journey that is profound and deeply rooted in Iraq and its culture. From classical poetry collections and the last days of Abbasid-era caliph Harun Al-Rashid, to the Kashan rugs made in Iraq and sold as if from Iran to the Ziziphus tree — all have witnessed the destruction caused by war. Wadood’s cataloging of “the losses that are never mentioned or seen. Not just people. Animals and plants and inanimate things and anything that can be destroyed” are painfully explored.

The first-person narrative allows Antoon to bring to life an intense sense of heartbreak that inevitably follows political turmoil and devastation. There is a back and forth in his novel between Nameer and Wadood’s manuscript — narratives that parallel to one another. And there is a magical realism as he personifies inanimate objects who feel love and sorrow, who feel their own deaths when bombs fall down on them and fires engulf them. Tragedy befalls the lives of people who are victims of power, but also befalls objects that are the collateral damage of powerful people’s wars.