Fans in tears as Lebanese diva Elissa shares her struggle with breast cancer in new music clip

What seemed like a fictional story about a cancer patient turns out to be an autobiography of Elissa herself. (Screen grab of video clip)
Updated 08 August 2018
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Fans in tears as Lebanese diva Elissa shares her struggle with breast cancer in new music clip

  • Elissa revealed the she is battling breast cancer, leaving many fans in complete shock
  • “You are the reason I am strong and healthy… you are my strength," she said

CAIRO: Fans of Lebanese diva Elissa broke into tears when watching her latest music video, in which she publicly shares for the first time her struggle with breast cancer.
In the much awaited-for music video, “Illa Kol Elli Beyhbouni” aka For All Those who Love Me, Elissa revealed that she is battling breast cancer, leaving many fans in complete shock.
She shared a clip of her song in a tweet on Monday, captioned: “You are the reason I am strong and healthy… you are my strength. And this story is a thank you: 'For all those who love me.'”
The video clip starts by featuring a woman inside an MRI machine with the date December 26, 2017 and the subtitle: ‘you have cancer.’
The viewer is then surprised to find that what seemed like a fictional story about a cancer patient is an autobiography of Elissa herself, with actual footage of the singer intercut throughout the clip.
The video features actual recordings of phone calls and exchanges between Angy, the director of the video, and Elissa, sharing her agony, fear and tears over the illness.
It included a clip of her fall on stage during a concert in Dubai earlier this year, hinting that it could have been because of the illness.
While the song was released before the clip, watching the video explains why in the lyrics Elissa expresses love for her close ones and fans, asking them “to hug her and never leave” while calling on them to “enjoy life, as every minute that passes will not come again.”


What We Are Reading Today: American Default by Sebastian Edwards

Updated 24 September 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: American Default by Sebastian Edwards

  • In 1933, when in a bid to pull the US out of depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt depreciated the US dollar in relation to gold, effectively annulling all debt contracts
  • Revaluing the dollar imposed a hefty loss on investors and savers, many of them middle-class American families

JEDDAH: The American economy is strong in large part because nobody believes that America would ever default on its debt. Yet in 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt did just that, when in a bid to pull the country out of depression, he depreciated the US dollar in relation to gold, effectively annulling all debt contracts. American Default is the story of this forgotten chapter in America’s history.

Sebastian Edwards provides a compelling account of the economic and legal drama that embroiled a nation already reeling from global financial collapse.

It began on April 5, 1933, when FDR ordered Americans to sell all their gold holdings to the government. This was followed by the abandonment of the gold standard, the unilateral and retroactive rewriting of contracts, and the devaluation of the dollar.

Anyone who held public and private debt suddenly saw its value reduced by nearly half, and debtors — including the US government — suddenly owed their creditors far less.

Revaluing the dollar imposed a hefty loss on investors and savers, many of them middle-class American families. The banks fought back, and a bitter battle for gold ensued. In early 1935, the case went to the Supreme Court. 

Edwards describes FDR’s rancorous clashes with conservative Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, a confrontation that threatened to finish the New Deal for good— and that led to FDR’s attempt to pack the court in 1937.

At a time when several major economies never approached the brink of default or devaluing or recalling currencies, American Default is a timely account of a little-known yet drastic experiment with these policies, the inevitable backlash, and the ultimate result.