Likely new Pakistan PM putting coalition government together

A Pakistani takes selfie with Imran Khan, center, head of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party, as he leaves a party meeting in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Aug. 6, 2018. (AP)
Updated 09 August 2018
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Likely new Pakistan PM putting coalition government together

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan's likely next prime minister is scrambling to get his coalition government in place as the caretaker government convenes the National Assembly next week to begin the process of transferring power to a new government following last month's national elections.

Caretaker Prime Minister Nasir-ul-Mulk asked President Mamnoon Husain on Thursday to convene the National Assembly on Aug. 13 for the swearing-in ceremony of newly elected lawmakers.

Popular longtime politician Imran Khan is expected to be elected premier next week. His Tahreek-e-Insaf party says it enjoys the backing of 180 lawmakers in the 342-seat assembly and he needs 172 votes to become prime minister for the next five years.


At least 12 dead in Mali attack — sources

Updated 26 September 2018
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At least 12 dead in Mali attack — sources

  • Militants claiming allegiance to Daesh have been clashing with local groups
  • Mali’s unrest stems from a 2012 Tuareg separatist uprising which was exploited by militants

BAMAKO: At least 12 Tuareg civilians died Tuesday in an attack in eastern Mali, a region hit by chronic unrest between local tribes and jihadist militants, sources said.
About 200 people, many of them civilians from the Fulani and Tuareg tribes, have been killed in the area this year.
Militants claiming allegiance to Daesh have been clashing with local groups backing a French security force and the Malian army.
The attack took place 45 kilometers (28 miles) west of Menaka, according to a local official, a security source, and a statement by former rebels in the Movement for the Salvation of Azawad (MSA).
“Armed men on motorcycles killed at least 12 civilians,” the official said, citing a resident of the town who claimed to have seen the bodies.
The official, who asked not to be named, added that “for now we do not know exactly who did it. I don’t know if it was the result of a dispute between tribes or a terrorist act.”
The security source said some of his sources spoke of 12 dead, while others put the toll at 16.
The MSA statement said “armed individuals on motorcycles had executed 17 civilians” from two Tuareg camps.
Mali’s unrest stems from a 2012 Tuareg separatist uprising which was exploited by militants in order to take over key cities in the north.
The extremists were largely driven out in a French-led military operation launched in January 2013.