FaceOf: Dr. Bandar bin Mohammed Al-Aiban, president of Saudi Arabia’s Human Rights Commission

Dr. Bandar bin Mohammed Al-Aiban is a former member of Saudi Arabia’s Shoura Council.
Updated 09 August 2018
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FaceOf: Dr. Bandar bin Mohammed Al-Aiban, president of Saudi Arabia’s Human Rights Commission

  • Saudi Human Rights Commission reaffirmed that accused persons in the Kingdom enjoy the safeguards to which they are entitled during investigation and trial
  • The Commission is a government body founded in 2005 to defend human rights

Dr. Bandar bin Mohammed Al-Aiban has been the president of Saudi Arabia’s Human Rights Commission since his appointment in 2009 upon a royal decree.
In 1979, Al-Aiban graduated from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles with a bachelor’s degree in industrial and systems engineering.
He also holds a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Southern California, and a Ph.D. in philosophy, political science and international relations from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore (1996).
His experience includes working for the Saudi Arabian National Guard as undersecretary of the national guard for the western sector. He also worked in the Saudi National Guard office in the Saudi Arabian Embassy in Washington. Al-Aiban was born in Riyadh in 1954. He is a former member of Saudi Arabia’s Shoura Council.
The Saudi Human Rights Commission is a government body founded in 2005 to defend human rights.
On Wednesday the commission condemned the Canadian government’s interference in Saudi Arabia’s domestic affairs which, it said, was a flagrant violation of international conventions and norms.
The commission reaffirmed that accused persons in the Kingdom enjoy the safeguards to which they are entitled during investigation and trial in accordance with national and international conventions to which the Kingdom is a party, as reflected by reports presented by Saudi Arabia before the UN contractual bodies.
It also emphasized the importance of protecting and promoting human rights, and rejected any politicization of human rights.


Around 3 million arrested for residency, labor violations in KSA

405,806 were transferred to their respective diplomatic missions to obtain travel documents. (SPA)
Updated 21 April 2019
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Around 3 million arrested for residency, labor violations in KSA

  • 1,227 Saudi citizens were arrested for harboring the violators against local laws, of which 50 are being detained, pending the completion of procedures

RIYADH: Nearly 3 million violators of residency, work and border security systems have been arrested in a year-long roundup, according to an official report.
Since the campaign began in November 2017, there have been 2,987,317 offenders, including 2,328,031 for violating residency regulations, 458,591 for labor violations and 200,695 for border violations, the Saudi Press Agency (SPA) reported.
The report said that 50,388 people were arrested while trying to cross the border into the Kingdom, 50 percent of whom were Yemeni citizens, 47 percent were Ethiopians and 3 percent were of other nationalities.
2,135 people were arrested for trying to cross the border into neighboring countries and 3,697 were arrested for involvement in transporting and harboring those violators. 1,227 Saudi citizens were arrested for harboring the violators against local laws, of which 50 are being detained, pending the completion of procedures.
Immediate penalties were imposed against 443,210 offenders; 405,806 were transferred to their respective diplomatic missions to obtain travel documents; 507,042 were transferred to complete their travel reservations; and 750,504 were deported.