Indonesian president picks cleric as running mate in 2019

Indonesian President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo, center left, speaks as his running mate Ma'ruf Amin, center right, listens prior to formal registration as candidates for the 2019 presidential election in Jakarta, Indonesia. Friday, Aug. 10,2018. (AP)
Updated 10 August 2018
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Indonesian president picks cleric as running mate in 2019

  • President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has formally registered as a candidate in 2019 elections
  • He has chosen a conservative Islamic cleric as his running mate

JAKARTA: Indonesian President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has formally registered as a candidate in 2019 elections and has chosen a conservative Islamic cleric as his running mate.
Jokowi, the first Indonesian president from outside the military and political elite, announced his vice presidential candidate, Ma’ruf Amin, on Thursday after weeks of fevered speculation in local media.
Amin heads the influential Indonesian Ulema Council and the advisory council of Nahdlatul Ulama, the world’s largest Muslim organization.
Jokowi’s pick disappointed liberals but analysts say it shores up his position among conservative Muslims who demonstrated their political power last year with the ouster of Jakarta’s minority Christian governor who was later imprisoned for blasphemy.
Jokowi’s opponent, former general Prabowo Subianto, is running with businessman and deputy Jakarta governor Sandiaga Uno.


UN climate talks in Poland go into overtime

Updated 13 sec ago
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UN climate talks in Poland go into overtime

KATOWICE, Poland: Officials from around the world are still working to agree on the fine print of the Paris climate accord after two weeks of talks, even as workers dismantle sections of the conferenced venue around them.
Diplomats and ministers prepared for a closing meeting at noon Saturday, a day past the original deadline, but success was still uncertain.
The UN talks in Katowice, Poland, are meant to provide a rulebook for all signatories of the 2015 accord, ensure financial support for poor countries and send a signal that countries are prepared to increase their efforts in years to come.
The rules for carbon emissions trading remain a key sticking point.
Scientists say emissions of greenhouse gas like carbon dioxide need to drop sharply by 2030 to prevent potentially catastrophic global warming.